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A 3-D printer allows veterinarians to look at spinal and skull injuries in animals and find new ways to correct them. Students and residents benefit from being able to observe and inspect models of different types of spinal and skull injuries. (Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Tompson)
June 16, 2015 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Technology

Veterinarians at the Mississippi State University Veterinary Specialty Center (VSC) are using 3-D printer technology to make models of spinal and skull injuries that help them develop better treatments for their animal patients.

The VSC purchased a Lutzbot Taz 4 3-D printer last year, and it is now one of the center’s most valuable pieces of equipment. Three-dimensional models from the printer allow specialists and practicing veterinarians to view internal trauma without the use of invasive procedures.

Jean Feugang, a research assistant professor in the Mississippi State University Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, microinjects a quantum dot into an ovarian follicle to monitor the egg's release from the follicle and eventual fertilization. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 30, 2013 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University scientists are working to find out why some pregnancies are successful and others are not.

Jean Feugang, a research assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, is studying the reproductive stage that remains one of the most mysterious -- the time just before conception.

Alexis Parisi of Oxford, left, and Kate Thompson of Picayune are taking part in National Science Foundation research programs for elite undergraduate students. Working in a laboratory in the Mississippi State University Department of Animal and Dairy Science, both are studying reproduction issues. (Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Thompson)
July 26, 2013 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Their classmates may be taking the summer off, but two undergraduate students at Mississippi State University are spending long hours in a laboratory conducting studies that would challenge seasoned researchers.

Their supervisor, Erdogan Memili, is not surprised. He nominated Alexis Parisi and Kate Thompson for National Science Foundation research programs for elite undergraduates.

Mississippi State University researcher Natalie Calatayud checks on female Boreal toads hibernating in a laboratory refrigerator. Researchers found the toads will lay eggs in captivity after spending time in simulated conditions that mimic their native environment. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
July 25, 2013 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Environment, Wildlife

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University researchers successfully promoted egg laying in threatened Boreal toads when they moved the amphibians out of the refrigerator and into the wine chiller.

Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station researchers at MSU are working with a group of 52 threatened Boreal toads native to the Colorado Rockies. The toads are housed in a special lab in the MSU Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology.

The Mississippi gopher frog is one of the most critically endangered species in North America. Mississippi State University is trying to learn how to get its 34 adult gopher frogs to breed in captivity. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
July 18, 2013 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Environment, Wildlife

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University has joined the ranks of conservationists trying to increase the population of one of the most critically endangered species living in North America.

Mississippi gopher frogs are native to south Mississippi, and for a time, the only known colony living and breeding in the wild was living in one Harrison County pond. They have since been found living near three other ponds in the DeSoto National Forest, bringing the total known wild population to an estimated 100-200 gopher frogs.

Daniel Peterson
January 24, 2013 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton, Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A Mississippi State University genetic researcher recently won a national award for his collaboration with a team of scientists to map a cotton genome.

Daniel Peterson, director of MSU’s Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology and scientist with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, received the 2012 Cotton Biotechnology Award from the National Cotton Council of America and Cotton Incorporated.

Curiosity led Clarissa Balbalian, the manager of Mississippi State University's plant diagnostic lab, into her career as a plant pathologist. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
December 20, 2012 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Plant Diseases

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Clarissa Balbalian’s job presents a new mystery every day.

“If you are analytical and like solving mysteries, this is the perfect job,” said Balbalian, the manager of Mississippi State University’s plant diagnostic lab. “I like working with people and helping them find solutions to their problems, too.”

Balbalian studied biology at Longwood University in Virginia, and then earned her master’s degree in forest pathology at West Virginia University.

Eighth-grade science teachers Judy Harden of Saltillo (left) and Joan Estapa of Bay Saint Louis conduct experiments during an intense two-week course in functional genomics and biology at Mississippi State University. The teachers were taking part in a Research Experience for Teachers grant under the supervision of an associate professor in MSU's Department of Animal and Dairy Science. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
July 19, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Two middle-school science teachers returned to college this summer for lessons in functional genomics and biology that did not exist their first time around, and they educated their professor at the same time.

Mississippi School for Math and Science student Brenna Nye conducts stem cell research at Mississippi State University through the MSU/MSMS research program, which pairs academically talented high school students with MSU faculty mentors. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
May 3, 2012 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Family

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Not many 17-year-olds spend their free time doing stem cell research, but an interest in helping special-needs children brought Brenna Nye to Mississippi State University to do just that.

March 2, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Biotechnology, Remote Sensing Technology, Technology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Those interested in learning about new technology that can improve farm management and operations should plan on attending Mississippi State University Extension Service’s Precision Agriculture Workshop.

The free workshop will be held on March 11 at the Forrest County Extension Conference Center in Hattiesburg. The workshop starts at 8:30 a.m. and wraps up with a free lunch at 12:30 p.m.

March 18, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Biotechnology, Forest Ecology, Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Each year, replacing deteriorated wood in U.S. homes costs billions of dollars, but research at Mississippi State University is helping protect homeowners’ wallets and the environment.

“Since 1988, scientists in the Forest and Wildlife Research Center have been studying the development of totally organic biocides,” said Tor Schultz, MSU forest products professor.

MSU doctoral student Erica Schlickeisen, left, and her major professor, aquatic ecologist Eric Dibble, prepare to sample plants in one of the tanks at the mesocosm on MSU's South Farm. (Photo by MSU Department of Wildlife and Fisheries/Sandor Dibble)
May 7, 2009 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Aquatic researchers at Mississippi State University study the natural mechanisms at work in lake ecosystems so they can find better ways to manage habitats, but large bodies of water do not always make good laboratories.

MSU biochemistry major Erika Knott prepares a slide for examination under the microscope. Knott spent her summer studying products that occur in the environment as TNT breaks down. (Photo by Marco Nicovich)
February 19, 2009 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – While scientists are unsure about TNT's long-term effect on the environment as it breaks down, Mississippi State University student Erika Knott discovered a dynamic way to practice the art of forensics through a research project on its degradation.

June 19, 2008 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University’s Institute for Digital Biology hosted a four-day international conference in May on avian genomics.

In hosting this conference, MSU joined a prestigious list of genetic research institutions that includes biomedical institutes in the United Kingdom, Japan and Spain, as well as the Stowers Institute in Kansas City, Mo., and the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in New York.

Walter Solomon clips rice leaf tissue from a historic rice breeding line as part of the DNA extraction process. (Photos by Robert H. Wells)
April 10, 2008 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

By Robert H. Wells
Delta Research and Extension Center

STONEVILLE -- A multi-state project to reveal genetic markers for some of the Mid-South's best rice breeding lines in history is underway with the goal to produce a genetic map of about 470 of the most successful rice varieties.

November 15, 2007 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Several students at Mississippi State University are excelling in a field that did not even exist when they were born.

In a program that combines the fields of biology, chemistry, physics and engineering, MSU biological engineering and biochemistry and molecular biology students are constructing DNA “machines” to do jobs at the genetic level. “Synthetic biology” is the term used for the new field of study that emerged in the late 1990s.

Preparing Mississippi State University's entry for this fall's International Genetically Engineered Machine competition are, from left, Dr. Din-Pow Ma, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, Victor Ho, biochemistry doctoral student, and Dr. Filip To, professor of agricultural and biological engineering.
June 28, 2007 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Students at Mississippi State University are using genetic engineering to build “machines” once only dreamed about in science fiction.

Last year, nine graduate and undergraduate students genetically engineered E.-coli bacteria to glow green in the presence of hydrogen, providing a safe way to measure the hydrogen available in hard to probe places like fuel cells. They entered this new design in the International Genetically Engineered Machine, or iGEM, competition held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

This tractor pulls a Veris cart, which uses satellite technology to map soil types. Researchers hope to connect soil types with reniform nematode populations so they can predict infestations and employ site-specific treatments. (Photo by Robert H. Wells/MSU Delta Research and Extension Center)
May 3, 2007 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

By Robert H. Wells
Delta Research and Extension Center

STONEVILLE -- A Delta researcher is using new biological control technology to combat reniform nematodes, underground worms that cause Mississippi cotton producers losses of $30 million annually.

December 19, 2006 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A multidisciplinary effort at Mississippi State University to create an agricultural genomic database has resulted in a million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The funding will support ongoing efforts to enlarge AgBase, an online database developed by College of Veterinary Medicine researcher Dr. Shane Burgess and College of Engineering researcher Susan Bridges. Burgess and Bridges are also co-directors of the Institute for Digital Biology at MSU.

Erdogan Memili
December 7, 2006 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cutting-edge genetic research by a Mississippi State University animal scientist may help solve a problem that costs livestock producers millions of dollars each year.

The research by Erdogan Memili, an assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, is aimed at improving fertility in cattle and can be applied to other mammals.

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