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Seniors Tackling Cancer

Purple ribbon.Today we talk more often of “cancer survivors” than “cancer victims”.  Much progress has been made in prevention, early detection, treatment options, and caring for those affected by the disease.  Nonetheless, it remains a scary word and over 13,000 Mississippians are likely to be diagnosed with cancer this year.  Seniors Tackling Cancer is a project developed by Mississippi State University Extension Service (MSU-ES) to help communities find ways to improve the prevention, early detection, and ability to live with cancer.  Though cancer is age-blind, it more frequently impacts seniors.  While the project focuses on older residents, its output will likely benefit all age groups. Community members are brought together to assess what is and is not working in their area to address cancer and then begin a grassroots effort to effect positive change.  Change comes through the work of locally formed community action groups and the efforts of MSU-ES trained lay health education Combating Cancer Volunteers.  The project was initially conducted in Winston County, Mississippi.

Mississippi is #25 in the nation in the rate of cancer incidence, but #3 in the rate of deaths attributable to cancer.  That disparity may be due to such things as the cancer being diagnosed later in the disease process, limited access to care, the nature of the particular cancers, etc.  An unknown author once said “We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.”  Working with local communities, we will not find a cure for cancer, but we can find ways to improve prevention, increase early detection, and help improve the quality of life of those living with cancer.


Combating Cancer Volunteers

cancer awareness ribbonThe Combating Cancer Volunteer is part of the Seniors Tackling Cancer project and is umbrellaed under the Master Health Education Volunteer Program. The goal of this program is to train volunteers to share health messages on cancer risk factors and the importance of early detection in combating cancer.

Volunteers are required to participate in a training course to sufficiently prepare them to give presentations to the community. After receiving the training, volunteers agree to give 20 hours of service back to the community. Participants in the program are given packaged presentations that can be used to educate friends, relatives, co-workers, faith-based organizations, civic clubs and other community members about the following cancers:

  • Breast Cancer
     
  • Colorectal Cancer
     
  • Lung Cancer
     
  • Prostate Cancer

See the Combating Cancer Volunteers Newsletter!  


 

The community report below has been developed to give voice to the findings of the community forums and to the residents of Winston County who participated in the process and are working today to turn their concerns into action. Much can be learned in this report about how civic organizations, churches, businesses, schools, public officials and other fellow residents may find opportunities suggested in these findings to get involved and take action supportive of reducing cancer’s impact on their families, friends, and neighbors.

Advertisement for 'Seniors Tackling Cancer' with a water wheel in the background and three flags are flying beside it just above bushes.

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Publications

Publication Number: P3608
Publication Number: P3607
Publication Number: P3606
Publication Number: M2395
Publication Number: M2396

News

Woman smiling at a table.
Filed Under: Food and Health, Food, Health, Nutrition and Wellness June 8, 2021

The kids are out of school, and for some of us, our schedule is a little bit out of routine. As a mom of four, I know how hard it can be to keep those summer bellies full, so I want to share some of my go-to tips to help.

Flood waters surround a home in the south Delta.
Filed Under: Agriculture, Health, The PROMISE Initiative, Rural Health June 7, 2021

To some people, farming is an idyllic way of life, but producers face some unique stressors that can impact their well-being. In fact, a national poll by the American Farm Bureau Federation in 2019 confirmed that about two in five farmers and farm workers reported experiencing increased stress levels and more mental health challenges since 2014.

Close up of triangular watermelon slices on a plate.
Filed Under: Food and Health, Food, Health, Nutrition and Wellness May 24, 2021

Whether your summers are filled with activities or dedicated to relaxation, these recipes from The Food Factor can help you make meals and snacks a breeze.

Closeup of soft granola bars on a plate.
Filed Under: Food, Health, Nutrition May 18, 2021

Keeping a healthy snack on hand is a good way to avoid impulse eating. These Soft Granola Bars, filled with whole grains, dried fruit, and honey instead of sugar, are a tasty treat when I want something sweet, and they keep me away from the vending machine or drive-through.

A woman sits on a patio behind a container where greens are growing.
Filed Under: Food and Health, Food, Health, Nutrition and Wellness May 13, 2021

A career as a registered dietitian wasn’t what Qula Madkin had in mind when she started college, but she has no doubt it was meant to be.

Listen

Friday, January 24, 2020 - 5:45am
Friday, January 17, 2020 - 5:45am
Wednesday, December 25, 2019 - 7:00am
Wednesday, December 18, 2019 - 7:00am

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Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. David Buys
Associate Professor
State Health Specialist
Portrait of Ms. Qula Madkin
Extension Instructor