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Master Gardener Garden Calendar

January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December


 

January

  • Now is the time of year that Cabin Fever and garden catalogs in our mailboxes get us dreaming about getting out into the garden.

Planning

  • Start plans for changes or improvements in the garden on paper.
  • Order seed for early planting.

Equipment

  • Repair and sharpen mowers and tools.Order new pots and markers.
  • Check condition of sprayers.

Planting

  • Set out trees and shrubs.
  • Sweet Peas, Poppies, and Larkspur.

Fertilizing

  • January - March is the proper time to fertilize trees and shrubs.
  • Apply lime to lawns if needed.

Pest Control

  • Scale on broad-leaved evergreens should be sprayed with dormant oil for control.

Pruning

  • Trim Nandinas.

Mulch

  • Mulch Lilies with compost.
  • Protect tender plants during periods of extreme cold.

Miscellaneous

  • Keep bird feeders stocked. Provide water for birds.
  • After freeze check to make sure plants have not heaved out of the ground.

Home Accent

  • Collect winter berries and tree needles for a winter potpourri.Mahonia and Aucuba will root in water indoors and provide color from the outdoors.
  • A small amount of sugar in the water will help prevent Holly branches from losing berries.Wash and dust leaves of house plants.
  • Inspect house plants for insects and diseases.

In Bloom

  • Camellia, Winter Honeysuckle, Winter Jasmine, and in mild winters Flowering Quince.

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February

Planning

  • Decide on plants you would like to have in your spring garden and flower beds.
  • Consider buying new plants that you have not tried before.
  • Determine how many seed packets you need, remember to order extra seed if you are planning to replant for a second crop of flowers after the heat of the summer.

Equipment

  • Check tools for rust. Clean rust from spades and hoes. Prevent future rust by coating tool heads with mineral oil or used motor oil.

Planting

  • Plant cold weather annuals Nasturtiums, Pansies, Snapdragons, English Daisies, Sweet William, and Calendulas
  • Start cold weather vegetables in cold frame Broccoli, Cauliflower, Onion sets, English Peas, Kale, Carrots, Collards, Beets, Radishes, Kohlrabi, and Chinese Cabbage.
  • Plant Asparagus in prepared beds.
  • Start seeds of Herbs indoors for transplant outdoors.
  • February is an ideal time to set out Dogwoods. Planting site should be well drained and plants should be planted shallowly. Dogwood prefers acid soil.
  • Broad-leaved Evergreens such as Magnolia, Holly, and Photinia can be set out at this time.
  • Plant new roses, or move old roses soon after February 15.

Fertilizing

  • Roses -- Apply top-dressing of organic fertilizer under thick layer of compost or rotted manure.
  • Fertilize Trees and Shrubs (not spring flowering shrubs) if not fertilized in January.

Pest Control

  • Spray garden with dormant spray. This will kill many eggs and spores of insects and diseases. Do not apply if temperatures will dip below freezing within 4 hours of application.

Pruning

  • Prune evergreens for size and shape.Cut out dead wood of flowering shrubs. Dispose of clippings to prevent disease or insect spread.
  • Prune Hydrangeas during the last week in the month.

Home Accent

  • Winter blooming shrubs can be forced to bloom indoors by cutting stems when buds begin to swell and placed in water indoors. Warmer temperatures will stimulate blooming. Place sprays of Forsythia, Flowering Quince, Oriental Magnolia, or fruit trees in a vase in a sunny window.

In Bloom

  • Crocus, early Daffodils, Helleborus, Hyacinth, Pansies, Scilla, Snowdrop, Snowflake, Violet, Camellia, Forsythia, Flowering Quince, Loropetalum, Pussy Willow, Thumbergia Spirea, and Winter Jasmine.

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March

Planting

  • Plant new roses before March 15.
  • Broad-leaved Evergreens such as Magnolia and Holly can be set out at this time.
  • Plant cold weather annuals Sweet William, English Daisies, Pansies, and Calendulas.
  • Divide Mondo Grass and Liriope.Divide Cannas, Chrysanthemums, Coreopsis, Phlox, and Obedient Plant.
  • Start seeds for Tomatoes, Bell peppers, and Eggplant.Set out Thyme, Lemon Balm, Oregeno, Chives, Sage, and Winter Savory.
  • Sow seeds of Johnny Jump-ups, Sweet Peas, Larkspur, Forget-me-nots, and Baby Blue Eyes.
  • Flowering shrubs may be moved at this time. Larger shrubs should be moved with a ball of dirt and smaller shrubs may be moved bare-rooted.
  • This is the best month to move Crape myrtles.
  • Lawns may be sodded at this time.Plant Gladiolus throughout this month for continuous bloom.Plant Hostas.
  • Caladiums can be started in outdoor containers as soon as weather warms.

Fertilizing

  • Fertilize all the garden except acid-loving plants.
  • Topdress Camellias with azalea-camellia fertilizer.
  • Lime Peonies, Clematis, and Boxwoods.

Pest Control

  • Spray new rose leaves for black spot weekly.

Pruning

  • Prune roses at this time. Remove dead and weak canes. Properly dispose of clippings.
  • Prune Crape myrtles and Altheas.
  • Prune evergreens for shape and size as early in the month as possible.
  • Cut English Ivy back very hard. It will come back very nicely in the spring.
  • Trim Mondo Grass and Liriope with lawn mower set on highest setting (6 inches). Dispose of trimmings.

Mulch

  • Replenish mulch around Azaleas and Camellias.

Miscellaneous

  • Dispose of fallen Camellias blossoms to prevent blight.
  • Rake up seed hulls from under bird feeders. They will smother new growth.
  • Remove dead flowers from tulips and daffodils. Do not cut foliage before it turns yellow and dies.

Home Accent

  • Divide or repot overgrown houseplants. Cut back weak parts to encourage new growth. Apply fertilizer every 2 weeks or so.

In Bloom

  • Bluebells, Chionodoxa, Daffodil, Hyacinth, early Iris, Pansies, Violet, Carolina Jasmine, Azaleas and Camellias, Forsythia, Pearl Bush, Photinia, Flowering Quince, Spirea, flowering fruit trees (Crabapple, Cherry, Pear, and Peach), Oriental Magnolia, and Redbud.

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April

Planting

  • Divide Violets, Shasta Daisies, Liriope, Ajuga, Mums and other Perennials.
  • Plant Okra,Melons, Peas, Corn , Beans, Eggplant, Cucumbers, and Tomatoes.
  • Set out Basil.
  • Set out summer annuals if danger of frost is past: Ageratum, Allysum , Begonias, Geraniums, Dianthus, Celosia, Marigolds, Moss Rose, Petunias, Impatiens, Coleus, and Caladiums.
  • Plant summer and fall blooming bulbs: Callas, Cannas, Dahlias, Gladiolus, and Gloriosa Lilies.
  • Sow Zinnias for early summer blooms.

Fertilizing

  • Fertilize Tomatoes with 10-10-10

Pruning

  • Remove any freeze damaged and dead wood.
  • Prune Azaleas during or after blooming. Remove faded flowers from Kurume Azaleas.
  • Prune flowering shrubs after they finish blooming. If pruning can be done while the shrub is flowering, the trimmed off parts can be brought indoors for floral displays.
  • Disbud roses and peonies for specimen flowers.

Mulch

  • Always mulch in new plantings to help assure success.

Miscellaneous

  • National Arbor Day is the fourth Friday of April.
  • Paint and repair garden furniture and other hard construction (bird bath, bird houses, mailbox, deck, etc.).
  • Buy Azaleas in bloom to be sure of color.

In Bloom

  • Ajuga, Alyssum, Bleeding-Heart, Candytuft, Columbine, Daffodil, Daisy, Daylily, Forget-me-not, Grass pinks, Iris, Jacob's ladder, Lily-of-the-valley, Pansy, Phlox, Divaricata, Primrose, Ranunculus, Scilla, Shooting star, Sweet William, Thrift, Tulip, Vinca, Violet, Azaleas, Beauty Bush, Deutzia, Lilac, Spireas, Tamarisk, Viburnum, Weigela, Yellow Jasmine, Dogwood, Redbud, and most flowering trees.

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May

Planting

  • Plant Crape myrtles when plants are in color.
  • Plant annuals and perennials early in the month, keep well watered.
  • Set out Chrysanthemums.
  • Continue planting Gladiolus. Can also plant Calla lilies, Ginger lilies, Tuberose, and Cannas.
  • Take Hydrangea cuttings and let root in coarse sand.
  • In the shade plant: Impatiens, Coleus, Sweet Alyssum, Lobelia, and annual Dianthus.
  • In the full sun plant: Verbena, Periwinkle, Ageratum, Marigolds, Zinnas, Petunias, Wax Begonia, Clematis, Four-o'clocks, and Portulaca.
  • Vegetables that should be planted this month: Cucumbers, Tomato, Pepper, Squash,Peas, Beans, Eggplant, Corn, Okra, Parsley, Watermelons, and Cantalope.

Pest Control

  • Keep an eye on garden pests and diseases: red spiders, thrips, aphids, lacebugs, lacewings, mealy bugs, caterpillars, slugs, snails, mildew, fungus, and crown rot.

Pruning

  • This is the last month to prune Azaleas and Camellias as new buds are formed in June.
  • Gardenias can be pruned by bringing a bouquet inside to beautify the house.
  • Cutting bouquets regularly will keep your plants pruned and prolong the blooming season. Cut in early morning or late afternoon and put into water immediately.
  • Remove seedpods from bulbs and irises, they sap the plants strength.

Mulch

  • Mulch layer helps maintain moisture, and can protect roots from extremes in temperature.

Miscellaneous

  • Water deeply during weeks that it does not rain.

Home Accent

  • Repot house plants during their active growing period: April through September.
  • May is a good month to repot and divide overcrowded ferns.

In Bloom

  • Confederate Jasmine, Gardenias, Begonias, Impatiens, Salvia, Geraniums, Roses, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Azaleas, Clematis, Phlox, Sweet William, Deutzia, Honeysuckle, Golden-rain tree, Pomegranate, Mock Orange, and Weigela.

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June

Planting

  • Plant Crape myrtles in bloom to be sure of color.
  • Replace turf in deep shade with ground cover: Liriope, Ajuga, or Jasmine.Set out Caladiums in shady areas.
  • Plant summer annuals Ageratum, Cockscomb, Impatiens, Marigolds, Sunflowers, Four-o'clocks, and Periwinkle.
  • Plant Tomatoes late this month to insure harvest late into fall. Cherry Tomatoes are a choice that are heat tolerant.
  • Choose Daylilies now that they are in bloom for planting in your garden.
  • Divide and replant Iris, cut leaves back to 6 inches after transplant.
  • Plant Zinnias and Marigolds now for a second crop of flowers.
  • Plant Snapbeans, Lima beans, Cucumbers, Eggplants, Peppers, Squash, Tomato plants.
  • Gladiolus planted now will give lovely fall blooms.

Fertilizing

  • Fertilize Camellias with Azalea-Camellia fertilizer if not done earlier in the year.
  • Fertilize Bermuda and Zosia grass.Fertilize Tomatoes, Cucumbers, and Zuccines monthly with 5-10-10.
  • Fertilize annuals and perennials.

Pest Control

  • Mow lawn in the morning to reduce the chance of starting Brown Spot (fungus).
  • Remove Zinnias with powdery mildew and replant.

Pruning

  • Prune Oleander after blooming ends.Pinch Dahlias and Mums to assure a compact growth habit.
  • Remove blackberry fruiting canes after harvest. Prune new canes to encourage side branching.
  • Faded flowers should be removed from Daisy, Daylily, and other summer flowers.
  • Prune out dead and damaged wood from trees and shrubs.

In Bloom

  • Ageratum, Althea, Balloon Flower, Bee Balm, Begonia, Blackberry Lily, Butterfly Weed, Coreopsis, Cornflower, Fevervew, Funkia, Gladiolus, Hollyhock, Japanese Iris, Lily, Nicotiana, Petunia, Phlox, Rose Scabiosa, Shasta Daisy, Sweet Pea, Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Golden-rain Tree, Hypericum, Mimosa, Stewartia, Sourwood, Vitex, Yucca, Jasmine, Crape myrtle, Daylily, Geranium, Hibiscus, Hydrangea, Impatiens, Lantana, Morning Glory, Oleander, Plumbago, Portulaca, Purslane, Salvia, Veronica, Dusty Miller, Four O'clock, and Zinnia.

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July

Planting

  • Plant Pumpkin seeds for a Halloween harvest.
  • Use Portulaca or Marigolds to fill in bare spots of flower bed.
  • Root cuttings of Azalea, Boxwood, Camellia, Gardenia, Holly, and Poinsettia in coarse sand. Cuttings should be 4-6 inches from new growth with lower leaves removed.
  • Plant now for color in the fall: Marigold, Zinnia, Celosia, and Joseph's Coat.
  • Daylilies may still be planted.
  • Start cuttings for house plants: Ivy, Wandering Jew, Philodendron, and Begonia.
  • Plant fall vegetables: Cabbage, Parsley, and Collards.

Fertilizing

  • Do not fertilize Camellias after July 1.
  • Fertilize Chrysanthemums around July 15.
  • Fertilize all of the garden as you did in March.
  • Fertilize lawns with well balanced fertilizer.

Pruning

  • Remove faded flowers from Crape myrtle to encourage a second blooming.
  • Pinch back Mums before July 15.Cut back broken or withered fern fronds. New growth will appear for fall garden.
  • All Vegetables must be picked regularly to ensure continued bearing.
  • When cutting Boxwood into a hedge, make sure the base is wider than the top to allow sunlight to reach base of plants.
  • Remove dead limbs from trees and shrubs.
  • Roses should be pruned to encourage fall blooms.
  • Remove flowers from basil and cut mint to encourage new shoots.

Mulch

  • Check mulch on Azaleas and Camellias mulch should be at least 2 inches thick.
  • Zinnias and Mums must be kept mulched to reduce cultivation necessary and conserve moisture.

Miscellaneous

  • Water Azaleas well because they are setting flower buds now.
  • Cut grass at 2.5 - 3 inches during hot weather.
  • Water the whole garden deeply once a week.

 

Home Accent

  • Never leave house plants in a closed home over a vacation. Either water and place under a shady tree or have a friendly neighbor come in and water them for you.

In Bloom

  • Caladium, Cleome, Crape myrtle, Four-o'clocks, Hibiscus, Impatiens, Liriope, Marigold, Mallow, Moonflower, Oleander, Periwinkle, Plumbago, Portulaca, Salvia, Ageratum, Zinnia, Balsam, Butterfly weed, Canna, Cleome, Cosmos, Dahlia, Daylily, Funkia, Gladiolus, Lily, Lycoris, Lythrum, Petunia, Phlox, Rudbeckia, Scabiosa, Shasta Daisy, Snapdragon, Snow-on-the-mountain, Tuberose, Verbena, Veronica, Althea, Buddleaia, and Montbretia.

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August

Prepare

  • Plan beds for bulbs. Order Tulips, Hyacinths, Dutch Iris, Daffodils, Narcissus, and Amaryllis.
  • Prepare beds for October planting by adding compost or leaf mold.

Plant

  • Daylilies in a sunny location, they will be well established before winter.
  • Divide and transplant Louisiana Iris, Easter Lily, Canna, Liriope, Ajuga, and Shasta Daisy.
  • Plant cool season vegetables: Broccoli, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Spinach, Potatoes, Lettuce, Carrots, Beets, Radishes, and English Peas.
  • Plant warm season grasses: Buffalo, Bermuda, and St. Augustine.
  • Mums should be planted for September bloom and fall color.
  • Marigolds, Asters, Zinnias, and Celosia can be planted to replace faded annuals.
  • Plant seeds of Calendula, Columbine, English Daisy, Forget-me-not, Pansy, Sweet William, and Violet.

Fertilize

  • If acid loving plants including Azaleas, Camelias, and Gardinia show signs of chlorosis (yellowing of leaves), a treatment of Iron Chelate should cause leaves to regain their green color.
  • Feed mums with a complete fertilizer every two weeks and water thoroughly until buds show color.

Prune

  • Cut back annuals such as Impatiens and Vinca to encourage fall blooms.
  • Disbud Camellias, Dahlias, and Chrysanthemums to produce specimen blooms.
  • Continue to remove dead heads in the garden to stimulate blooming.
  • Cut back rose canes to 24-30 inches from ground for autumn blooms.
  • Remove dead and damaged wood from trees and shrubs.

Water

  • Water garden deeply, but infrequently throughout the month.
  • Water early in the morning or in late afternoon. Water on leaves during the hot of the day can cause the sun to burn leaves.
  • Potted plants and hanging baskets need to be watered daily.
  • Make sure Azaleas and Camelias stay well watered, because they are forming flower buds for next year.

Miscellaneous

  • Mow weekly and leave clippings on the lawn.
  • Turn compost pile.
  • Feed the birds.

In Bloom

  • Ageratum, Angel's Trumpet, Balsam, Begonia, Browallia, Caladium, Canna, Celosia, Clematis, Dahlia, Four-o'clock, Funkia, Gladiolus, Lily, Hosta, Impatiens, Marigold, Periwinkle, Phlox, Portulaca, Rattle Box, Salvia, Snow-on-the-mountain, Torenia, Vinca, Pink Zephyranthes lily, Zinnia, Althea, Butterfly Bush, Crape myrtle, Hydrangea, Oleander, Roses, and Tamarisk.

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September

Get Ready

  • Make sure you've ordered daffodils and other spring bulbs for October planting.
  • Build or buy compost bin in anticipation of autumn leaves.

Plant

  • Plant cool season leafy root vegetables: Carrots, Beets, Turnips, Lettuce, and Spinach.
  • Sow hardy annuals: Sweet Alyssum, Calendula, Annual Pinks, Snapdragon, and Sweet Peas.
  • Sow rye grass seed in winter lawns.

Fertilize

  • Stop feeding mums when the buds start showing color.
  • Acidify Azaleas and Camelias.

Water

  • Slow down watering of Azaleas and Hydrangea to allow them to harden against winter freezes.
  • Spray foliage of Camelias in anticipation of their bloom.
  • Water potted plants and hanging baskets frequently.

Prune

  • Disbud Camellias, Dahlias, and Chrysanthemums to produce specimen blooms. It is generally not a good idea to prune this late in the year, because new growth will be more susceptible to winter freezes.

Miscellaneous

  • Turn compost pile.
  • Propagate by layering. Scrape underside of a strong branch, bend down to ground, cover with soil and weigh down with a brick. Water from time to time and end of branch will put out new growth; becoming a new plant.
  • Pick flowers in bloom and dry for future arrangements. Bundle flowers together and hand upside down in a dry, sheltered area.
  • Repot houseplants. Prune away damaged foliage and give a good dose of food.

In Bloom

  • Canna, Cosmos, Copper Plant, Marigolds, Periwinkle, Plumbago, Crape myrtle, Althea, Four-o'clocks, Salvia, Ageratum, Coleus, Lycoris, Aster, Begonia, Celosia, Chrysanthemum, Coral Vine, Ginger Lily, Gladiiolus, Jacobina, Liriope, Morning Glory, Petunia, Phlox, Rattle Box, Rose, Spider Lily, Torenia, Vinca, White Zephyranthes Lily, Zinnia, Buddleia, Franklin Tree.

Fall Color

  • Flowering Dogwood with showy, drooping red leaves.
  • Ginko leaves turn pure yellow.

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October

Plant

  • Spring flowering bulbs should be planted this month, with the exception of tulips and hyacinths which should be placed in the refrigerator for 6 weeks before being planted in late December or early January.
  • Pot up Basil, Chives, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, and Sweet Marjoram for that sunny kitchen window.Wisteria and Trumpet Vine can be planted this month.
  • Annuals to plant are Pansies, Violas, Pinks, Flowering Cabbage and Kale, English Daisy, Wildflower planting, Cornflowers, Larkspur, and Queen's Anne Lace.
  • Perennials to plant include: Asters, Salvia, Hollyhock, Daylilies, Babies Breath, Iris, Shasta Daisy, Peonies, and Phlox.
  • Many evergreens may be planted this month.

Fertilize

  • Test soil in garden to monitor balance of minerals.
  • Foliar feed all plantings and lawns.

Prune

  • Remove damaged and dead wood from trees.
  • Pick blossom-like fruit of Golden Rain Trees and let dry for winter arrangements.
  • Prune back annuals like Blue Salvia and Dianthus to the ground and mulch, they may go through the winter and bloom again.

Miscellaneous

  • Dig up Caladiums now with foliage intact, allow to try, remove dried foliage and store in peat moss in a cool dark place for replanting next year.
  • Force bulbs for indoor show. Place bulb on gravel and water enough to cover the roots, keep in dark place until root system is established and sprout reaches 3 inches, bring gradually into the light and refill container with water to original level. Enjoy the blooms of Paper-white, Narcissus, Lily of the valley, Jonquil, or Hyacinth in this way.
  • Make sure the birds in your garden have food, shelter, and water.
  • Place leaves in compost bin.

In Bloom

  • Mums, Marigolds, Periwinkle, Salvia, Sasanquas, Golden Rain Tree, Roses, Ageratum, Aster, Camellia, Celosia, Colchicum, Dahlia, Petunia, Salvia, Torenia, and Zinnia.

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November

Plant

  • Plant shrubs and trees after soil cools.
  • Plant summer blooming perennials: Iris, Daylily, and Daisies.Plant winter and spring annuals: Pansy, Pinks, Flowering Cabbage and Kale.
  • Root Rose cuttings.

Water

  • Water all newly planted trees and plants regularly.

Prune

  • Remove dead limbs and prune evergreen shrubs.
  • Cut off tops of brown perennials, leave roots in the soil.

Do Not Prune

  • Spring flowering shrubs such as Azaleas, Hydrangeas, Mock Orange, Spirea, and Flowering Quince because flowers buds are already forming.
  • Delay pruning of most trees and shrubs until February since any new growth stimulated by pruning may be killed by a sudden freeze.

Miscellaneous

  • Put leaves and spent annuals into compost bin.
  • Add Mulch to your garden and all ornamental beds for winter protection.
  • Repair and sharpen garden tools, store with light coat of oil to prevent rusting.
  • Build bird feeders and houses.

In Bloom

  • Impatiens, Cannas, Roses, Witch Hazel, Gerber Daisies, Sweet Olive, Camellias, Sasanquas, Japanese Plum, and Poinsettias.

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December

Protect

  • Protect moveable plants from sudden changes in temperature by bringing them indoors.
  • Protect tender plants by placing layers of mulch, or pine straw, to a depth of 6-8 inches.
  • Water plants well if there is warning before a frost. Otherwise water as the plants begin to thaw.

Plant

  • Toward the end of the month plant Tulips and Hyacinth that have been in the fridge for 6 weeks.
  • This is a good time to move Japanese Magnolias.
  • Plant many types of bare root trees: fruit, nut or citrus.
  • Plant dormant shrubs: Azalea, Camellia, Nandina, Wax Ligustrium, Indian Hawthorne, Pyracantha, Mock orange, Hydrangea, Flowering Quince, and Spirea.
  • Herbs for a sunny window: Tarragon, Chives, Oregano, Marjoram, and Rosemary.

Prune

  • Prune fruit trees and shade trees to remove damaged wood.
  • Cut off tops of brown perennials, leave roots in the soil.
  • Do not prune spring flowering shrubs.
  • Ferns will come back from the ground, cut back brown fronds.
  • Cut Mistletoe out of trees.

Indoor Plants

  • House plants to consider: African Violets, Amaryllis, Begonia, Bromeliads, Christmas Cacti, Dieffenbachia, Ferns, Philodendron, Schefflera, and Weeping Fig.
  • Feed houseplants twice during the winter months.

Miscellaneous

  • To maintain a live Christmas tree in good condition, mix in a 2 liter bottle: 8 oz non-diet soda, 2 oz vinegar, 1 oz mouthwash. Fill the bottle with water. Keep base of tree in this solution. After Christmas have your tree turned into mulch. Some Christmas decorations are poisonous to people and pets: Keep Boxwood, Holly, Mistletoe, and Jerusalem Cherry high up and out of reach.

In Bloom

  • Sweet Pea, Sasanquas, Poinsettia, Camellia, Osmanthus, Narcissus, and Amaryllis

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Publications

News

Warren County Master Gardener Yolanda Horne checks on worms living in a plastic bin on June 13, 2017. The worms were part of an exhibit on composting at the Know Your Roots: Grow Your Business workshop in Vicksburg, Mississippi. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Bonnie Coblentz)
Filed Under: Agri-tourism, Community, Master Gardener, Lawn and Garden June 16, 2017

VICKSBURG, Miss. -- Mississippians from a wide variety of backgrounds spent a day thinking of new ways to use landscapes and gardens to bring more profit and better value to agricultural enterprises and historic homes.

Know Your Roots: Build Your Business brought 29 participants together for the daylong workshop June 13 at the Southern Cultural Heritage Center. Sandy Havard, Warren County agent with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, coordinated the event.

Lida McDowell holds an alternanthera plant at her home in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on April 27, 2017. McDowell is a member of the Pine Belt Master Gardeners -- one of more than 60 such groups throughout the state that operate under the supervision of the Mississippi State University Extension Service. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
Filed Under: Women for Agriculture, Master Gardener May 4, 2017

HATTIESBURG, Miss. -- Lida McDowell taught science and math for 30 years at the high school and university levels, and she keeps finding ways to educate while enjoying an interest she had no time to pursue until retirement.

The raised-bed vegetable gardens she and church friend Karen Walker maintain year-round serve as a classroom for a young audience at Thames Elementary School in Hattiesburg.

“What we’re trying to do is get the kids to enjoy nature, be outside and appreciate where their food comes from,” McDowell said.

Lynn McMahan of Vancleave, past president of the Mississippi Master Gardeners, learns about plant diseases from Clarissa Balbalian, manager of the Mississippi State University Extension Service's plant diagnostic lab, during campus tours in 2013. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
Filed Under: Master Gardener October 12, 2016

TUPELO, Miss. -- For more than a quarter century, Mississippians with a love for horticulture have been helping to educate and serve their communities through a nationwide Extension Service program.

Oktibbeha County Master Gardener Charlie Weatherly pauses July 23, 2015, beside some of flowers growing in the Veterans Memorial Rose Garden, which he helped establish at the R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center at Mississippi State University. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Master Gardener July 24, 2015

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Long before Charlie Weatherly earned the state’s 2015 Master Gardener of the Year honor, his family roots were dug deep into the Mississippi soil.

Although he retired from Mississippi State University in 1997, Weatherly has not strayed far from the land-grant institution’s campus or mission. How could he? As a child, he frequently came to campus with his father, Ernest, who was a county agent for what is now the MSU Extension Service.

Pine Belt Master Gardeners Gerald Good and Margaret Thomas mark the 100th salad table built by the group during a workday in Purvis June 19, 2014. The table will be donated to the University of Southern Mississippi's Department of Sustainability. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Susan Collins-Smith)
Filed Under: Master Gardener June 23, 2014

PURVIS – The Pine Belt Master Gardeners reached a milestone June 19.

The group constructed its 100th salad table, which is designated for donation to the University of Southern Mississippi’s Office of Sustainability. It is one of many the group has donated throughout the last year.

When the Pine Belt Master Gardeners built two raised beds for demonstration at the Mississippi State University Lamar County Extension office in 2013, they did not expect the educational project to become so popular.

Success Stories

A male retiree in a plaid shirt and khaki slacks sits in front of a piano. On its soundboard is a picture of his late wife in her wedding gown and gloves.
About Extension, Master Gardener Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 3

In 2016, Myrtle native Michael Hale was looking for a meaningful, lasting way to remember his late wife, Vicki M. Smith.

 

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