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Conference Agenda

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News

Two men kneel over a square test plot and feel the texture of the sod.
Filed Under: Weed Control for Crops, Turfgrass and Lawn Management October 13, 2017

Mississippi’s sod producers experienced good news and bad news from 2017 weather conditions. Jay McCurdy, turfgrass specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the good news was a modestly warm spring with timely rainfall provided good growing conditions for most of the state’s sod farms. The bad news was the same weather promoted the growth of weeds and fungal diseases.

A sweet potato with a pink and brown outer surface is shown close up.
Filed Under: Sweet Potatoes October 6, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi producers are growing 28,100 acres of sweet potatoes this year, but not one of those is below the northern third of the state.

What keeps growers in south Mississippi from planting the increasingly popular crop? Weevils are mostly to blame.

“Sweet potatoes grown in south Mississippi require more inputs to exclude weevils from fields and have stricter regulations as far as how and where sweet potatoes can be shipped and marketed,” said Stephen Meyers, sweet potato specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Photo shows mature, dried soybean pods hanging against a brown, natural background.
Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Soybeans September 29, 2017

Official numbers show Mississippi’s soybean crop is ahead of schedule and in good shape, but many fields have actually spent a wet month waiting for harvest.

Trent Irby, Mississippi State University Extension Service soybean specialist, said this delay -- caused by frequent, heavy rains -- impacted a portion of the state’s crop.

Close up of a head of grain sorghum full of tiny brown seeds, along with other plant heads in the field around it.
Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Grains September 22, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi’s grain sorghum acreage is at an historic low, and market prices are not much better, but yields should be good.

Erick Larson, grain crops specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said that when market incentives went away after 2015, so did farmers’ desire to plant grain sorghum, also known as milo. State growers may have planted 10,000 acres this year, the fewest since record keeping began in 1929.

A closed boll is seen on a cotton plant growing in a field.
Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Cotton September 15, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Rain, cool weather, more rain and some wind have slowed cotton maturation, but since the crop was a little behind schedule, the damage may be less than if harvest were already underway.

Darrin Dodds, cotton specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said recent weather is causing some yield loss, but it is hard to estimate how much.

“Being late to a degree helped the crop because rain did not string out open cotton, but given that we are running out of heat, we may have been better off with an earlier crop that had been defoliated and was standing up when the rain came,” Dodds said.

Watch

Farmweek, Entire Show, September 23, 2016
Farmweek

Season 40 Show #10

Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 7:00pm
Farmweek, Entire Show, June 17, 2016
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #49

Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 7:00pm
Farmweek, Entire Show, Nov. 20, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #20

Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 6:00pm
Farmweek, Entire Show, November 6, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #18

Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 6:00pm
Farmweek, Entire Show, October 9, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #14

Thursday, October 8, 2015 - 7:00pm

Contact Your County Office

Contacts

Extension/Research Professor
Greenhouse Tomatoes and other vegetables, Field Vegetables, Mushrooms