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Japanese Maple

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Monday, September 10, 2018 - 2:00am

Host: Gary Bachman, Ornamental Horticulture Specialist

Transcription:

Japanese maples are known for their graceful forms, and their fall color really shines and today on Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Currently, there are literally hundreds of Japanese maple selections. These are the results of over three hundred years of selection development in their native Japan. There was a Japanese maple for nearly every landscape use. Japanese maples can be divided into two groups: dissected and non-dissected. Dissected types have deeply divided leaves that can appear lace-like having intricate patterns. Generally, these are more shrub-like and low growing. Non-dissected types have palm shaped leaves with five to nine lobes. These are usually upright and tree form with single or multiple trunks.

The variety Bloodgood is well known to many gardeners. It’s a maroon colored non-dissected tree that was a Mississippi medallion winner in 2000. Fall colors of Japanese maples range from flaming orange, blood red, and harvest gold. Dry weather can stress Japanese maples and induced enhanced fall color.

Try the selection senegal kaku with golden yellow fall foliage and coral red bark on young stems that intensify in the fall and winter. Planting in the fall is preferred as this will allow the roots to get established and be ready for new growth in the spring. Japanese maples prefer well-drained, moist, with slightly acidic soils with morning sun and afternoon shade. Supplemental water in summer and protection from wind helps keeping the trees looking their best. Leaves exposed to hot windy conditions will develop scorching on the leaf margins.

I am horticulturist Gary Bachman for Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

 

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