You are here

Combine Flower Color

Filed Under:
Thursday, June 14, 2018 - 2:00am

Host: Gary Bachman, Ornamental Horticulture Specialist

Transcription:

Combining colorful flowers is one way to create feeling and emotion in the garden today on Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Colors are not just colors. They have well defined properties of hugh, temperature, intensity, and value. Hugh is simply the name of the color. Blue is blue, and red is red. Colors can also have temperatures. Warm colors are reds, oranges, and yellows, while cool colors are greens, blues, and purples. The intensity of a color refers to how bright or dull it appear to the view. And value refers to how dark the color is. In other words, dark-red color.

Color can also have tints and shades. A color tint is how much white is blended into the color. The shade of a color refers to the elements of black mixed in. Reds and purples are attention grabbers. They are opposite on the spectrum and have extreme differences. Purple is a cool colors, while red is very warm. The colors compete for attention and seem to leap and flutter next to each other. The red of Jupiter’s beard and sage can energize any garden.

Blues, greens, and silvers are calming and cool in nature. The combination of these colors creates a sense of serene refinement and style. Japanese Painted Fern is an example of rich textures and stylish colors. Orange and pinks are analogous colors which are exciting when combined in the garden. These colors are said to have equal weights and create excitement as they compete with each other for your attention. But don’t worry about creating the perfect color combinations. Plant flowering annuals and perennials together just because they look good.

I’m horticulturist Gary Bachman for Southern gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Contact Your County Office