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April 12, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi farmers are plowing ahead optimistically into a new growing season as several commodities post life-of-contract highs on the market.

Many farmers still are reeling from the battles of 1995 which included tremendous insect control costs and a late summer drought.

April 8, 1996 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

By Jennifer Miller

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Timber production brings millions of dollars into Mississippi each year. But unfortunately, pine trees are falling victim to an unlikely predator -- kudzu.

Malcolm Montgomery, a Claiborne County resident, knows the damage kudzu can cause.

"I have 200 acres of seven-year-old pine trees that are planted next to a patch of kudzu," he said. It is difficult to control and if it is not stopped, it will eventually kill the pines."

April 8, 1996 - Filed Under: Family

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A spot or stain on a favorite piece of clothing can be one of the most frustrating sights in the world.

Fortunately, with the proper treatment, many stains can be removed, said Dr. Everlyn Johnson, extension clothing and textiles specialist at Mississippi State University.

To help consumers keep their clothing stain-free, Johnson provided suggestions taken from the stain removal guide published by the Cooperative Extension Service at MSU.

April 8, 1996 - Filed Under: Family

By Dawn R. Hanna

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- As spring cleaning gets into full swing, many Mississippians must decide what to do with boxes of discarded clothes -- plan a yard sale or find a second-hand clothing shop.

"Garage sales are a way of getting rid of things you no longer want, need or use," said Dr. Beverly Howell, extension family economics and management specialist at Mississippi State University. "They are also an excellent way of making extra cash, meeting new faces and just having fun."

April 4, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Technology

By Douglas Wilcox

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi soybean and cotton farmers should find it easier to decide what seed variety to plant these days, not by trial and error, but by accessing the Internet through their home computers.

The Mississippi soybean variety trials, conducted by the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, yield information ranging from how to select a seed variety for your field to the actual planting procedures. Any farmer in the world with a computer and Internet access can download the information from the World Wide Web.

April 4, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- This year's growing season is off to a slow start as many different obstacles have kept farmers out of their fields.

Cool, wet weather during March and into early April has muddied fields and kept soil temperatures low. Growers in counties across the state are watching the weather and waiting for fields to dry.

March 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Agricultural Economics

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- This year's planting intentions report yielded few surprises as producers based many acreage decisions on market prices.

Economists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced their 1996 crop predictions March 29. The biggest change for Mississippi is corn acreage, rising from 300,000 acres in '95 to 550,000 acres for 1996 -- an 83 percent increase.

March 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops
UNITED STATES
EXPECTED ACREAGE IN MILLIONS
  1996 1995 CHANGE
CORN 79.92 71.24 +12%
COTTON 15.24 16.93 -10%
GRAIN
SORGHUM
10.62 9.45
January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Forestry, Forest Economics

By Dawn R. Hanna

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippians have more than a billion reasons for celebrating Arbor Day on Feb. 9. Forestry is more than an asset to the state's environment; it's an asset to Mississippi's economy.

"Timber has been an important asset to Mississippi's economy, but in the last two years our forests generated more than a billion dollars in harvest value," said Dr. Bob Daniels, extension forestry specialist at Mississippi State University.

Mississippians begin celebrating tree planting week on Arbor Day, Feb. 9.

January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton, Insects-Crop Pests
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

JACKSON -- Cotton growers opposed to the boll weevil eradication program believe a ruling by the Mississippi Attorney General's Office is good news, but supporters of the program believe it is good news for the boll weevils.

In a ruling released Jan. 25, prior to a joint meeting of the House and Senate Agriculture Committees, the attorney general's opinion was that growers could keep the program with a two-thirds majority voting in favor of continuing the program.

January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

GRENADA -- Cotton growers from Mississippi's eastern counties recently aired complaints against 1995's boll weevil eradication efforts and received information on improvements planned for 1996.

Growers from Region IV's 29 counties down the eastern side of the state joined growers from across Mississippi at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Boll Weevil Management Corp. in Grenada.

A devastating insect year resulted in growers from several counties accusing eradication efforts for low yields and crop failures.

January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Family, Family Dynamics

By Dawn R. Hanna

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Traditionally when people think of Valentine's Day they think of hearts and flowers or chocolate candy. This year, try surprising your loved one with a special valentine gift made with love.

January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Family, Food and Health

By Dawn R. Hanna

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- People tend to celebrate Valentine's Day with gifts to show love and affection. Choosing a healthy gift will make loved ones' smiles last longer.

Consider other valentine gift ideas besides sweets for your sweetheart.

"Sugar is an empty source of calories and does not provide nutrients that our bodies need," said Dr. Melissa Mixon, extension human nutrition specialist at Mississippi State University.

Mixon said moderation is the key when eating sweets on Valentine's Day.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- 1995 has proved to be a year of highs and lows for Mississippi agriculture as some crops reached record values while others experienced disastrous yields.

Forestry, poultry/eggs, catfish and horticulture crops saw increases in value, but the state's overall estimated value of farm production dropped $56 million this year. Agricultural economists at Mississippi State University predict the state's estimated value of farm production will reach $4.37 billion for 1995.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forestry
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- In a continuing neck-and-neck battle for the No. 1 spot in Mississippi agriculture, forestry is expected to maintain its lead ahead of poultry and eggs with each passing the billion dollar mark again in 1995.

Posting an estimated harvest value of $1.1 billion, forestry gained about $36 million ahead of 1994 figures.

Poultry and eggs are estimated at almost $1.09 billion in 1995, an increase of $50 million.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Poultry

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Although overall estimated value of farm production is down in Mississippi for 1995, the poultry industry has scored another record-breaking year.

Agricultural economists at Mississippi State University predict the industry's value is $1.09 billion for 1995, up $50 million from 1994.

Poultry and eggs' rise in value is the highest in the state, even though it comes in second behind forestry's estimated farm value of $1.1 billion.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Catfish

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- High prices to growers and large volumes of fish processed through October combined to make 1995 a winning year for Mississippi's catfish industry.

The 1995 estimated value of farm production for Mississippi catfish is $301 million, up $21 million from last year. Catfish rose a notch in the state rankings this year, pushing ahead of soybeans, which dropped $61 million.

Catfish now ranks fourth on the state's top commodities list behind forestry, poultry and cotton, respectively.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Cotton
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Tobacco budworms didn't just take a bite out of cotton bolls, they joined the drought-like conditions to take a bite out of cotton growers' bank accounts.

"Growers not only harvested less cotton in 1995, but it was also one of the state's most expensive cotton crops ever," said Dr. Will McCarty, extension cotton specialist at Mississippi State University. "These two factors -- a smaller crop and higher costs -- are pushing a significant number of growers to the brink of financial disaster."

November 10, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Christmas Trees

By Dawn R. Hanna

STARKVILLE -- Mississippi Christmas tree growers welcome this year's crop with anticipation for a happy holiday season.

"Overall the crop looks great in spite of the drought," said Dr. Steve Dicke, extension forestry specialist in Raymond. "A few growers experienced some disease problems, but the outcome of the crop in general is outstanding."

Last year 220,000 Mississippi-grown trees were sold for about $5.2 million.

"Growers expect sales to be as good or better than last year," Dicke said.

November 3, 1995 - Filed Under: Nuts
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

STARKVILLE -- Still reeling from the February 1994 ice storm, Mississippi's pecans struggled through drought conditions this summer and may end up yielding only about 40 percent of the state's crop potential.

Dr. Freddie Rasberry, extension horticulture specialist at Mississippi State University, said alternate bearing years are common in pecan production. Trees may yield 25 percent of their crop one year, 75 percent the next, then back down the next.

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