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May 22, 1998 - Filed Under: Forages
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Recent dry weather has been great for putting up winter hay, but it's slowed the growth of summer grasses and reduced its quality.

Dr. Bill Tucker, supervisor of the Mississippi State University dairy farm, said abnormal weather has made the first cutting of summer hay late this season.

"The weather has been hotter and drier than normal and our summer grasses have not come out as vigorously as they usually do," Tucker said.

Quality, as well as quantity, suffers as well when there is not enough moisture.

May 21, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Two relatively new flowering plants are attracting attention across Mississippi. They are Husker Red penstemon and angelonia.

Husker Red penstemon was the Perennial Plant of the Year a couple of years ago. On a recent trip to Verona, I saw it in a Mississippi State University test garden, and it looked awesome!

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Children and Parenting

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Children want to have fun and parents often seem desperate to find a place for kids to stay during summer months. Working together may solve the problem.

Dr. Louise Davis, Mississippi State University Extension Service's child and family development specialist, said full-time care during the day might create the best environment for children.

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Family Financial Management

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Summer vacations can mean big headaches, but with careful planning and budgeting, they can be fun and relaxing.

Dr. Beverly Howell, Mississippi State University Extension Service's family economics specialist, said a plan for saving money makes a yearly vacation possible.

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Many people have no trouble selling used cars, houses and even land, but when it comes to selling timber, it's not easy doing it right the first time without help.

Dr. Dannie Reed, Mississippi State University Extension Service agent in Choctaw County, said a managed timber sale is the way to sell timber and get the best price. This requires an evaluation of the timber, an advertised sale and sealed bids.

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Shooting Sports
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A Mississippi 4-H program is doing what it can to ensure that a gun in the hands of a young person does not mean trouble.

Youth ages 8 to 18 enrolled in the Mississippi Field and Stream Program not only learn hunting, and wildlife and fisheries management, they also learn respect for guns and how and when to use them.

May 15, 1998 - Filed Under: Technology
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Weather discussions are not new to farmers, but a recently developed Internet site can take those talks to the next level.

May 14, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Now that Mother's Day is over, I would like to pose a question. What is the perfect rose?

When I was executive director of the American Rose Society, I loved to ask that in a group because it was almost certain to start a skirmish. If there were a few more rose growers in the world, we could probably start a small war with the question.

May 8, 1998 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Low log inventories around the state last winter kept timber prices high, and landowners continue to respond by bringing more to market.

Dr. Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said wet weather was a key factor in log inventories this winter.

"Rainy weather kept logging and transportation operations difficult from late October through February, especially in Central and South Mississippi," Daniels said.

May 7, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

There was something about the recent Garden and Patio Show in Jackson that really surprised me. Gardener after gardener was walking out of the show carrying a trellis, tower and even arbors. Climbing plants are back in business.

May 4, 1998 - Filed Under: Environment
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

GREENWOOD -- More than 100 Leflore County homes are safer places after families safely disposed of household hazardous wastes, but experts say hazardous waste remains in houses around the state.

Leflore County held a household hazardous waste roundup the last weekend in April. Lacey Henderson, Leflore County home economist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said 125 families brought waste products from the house that, if not properly disposed of, are dangerous to the environment.

May 4, 1998 - Filed Under: 4-H

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Parents and youth who think school is the only place to learn need to think again. The Mississippi 4-H program offers a wide variety of learning experiences this summer.

"Our summer calendar is full of fun camps, conferences and workshops on many topics," said Sandy Slocum, extension 4-H associate. "With these programs we want to educate kids about specific subjects, and also teach them valuable life skills. These events are enjoyable, and youth look forward to coming to them year after year."

May 4, 1998 - Filed Under: Organic Fruit and Vegetables

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Gardeners may want to consider the organic gardening trend this year when deciding how to care for gardens and the environment at the same time.

Organic gardening means growing and marketing healthy foods that have not been treated with synthetic chemicals, only natural fertilizers and pest control measures.

Dr. David Nagel, a horticulturalist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said many people choose to garden organically because they want to be environmentally friendly. Others have different reasons.

May 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Soybeans
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Some Mississippi farmers are banking on early soybean varieties to produce the yields of recent years because the markets are not going to be much help.

Dr. Tom Jones, agricultural economist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said there is more potential for soybean prices to go down than there is for them to increase.

"U.S. soybean acreage is up slightly, South American crops are strong and the forecast is for good growing conditions this year," Jones said. "There is just no reason for prices to come up anytime soon."

April 30, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

For years I have been hooked on growing salvias like this year's Mississippi Medallion winner Victoria Blue, as well as the Mexican bush sage and others. But this is the first year I have grown Salvia elegans, or pineapple sage, which is a must in your garden or on your patio.

April 24, 1998 - Filed Under: Corn
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Recent rains have slowed field work for Northeast Mississippi corn growers, but the state remains on schedule for more corn acres in 1998.

Dr. Erick Larson, corn specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said he expects the state to plant near the 1996 level of 630,000 acres, compared to 490,000 planted last year when growers harvested a record yield of 107 bushels per acre.

April 23, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

The buddleia has fragrant blossoms, attracts butterflies and excels as a cut flower. It is referred to as the butterfly bush in the United States, while in its native China they call it the Summer Lilac.

April 20, 1998 - Filed Under: Pets

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Having pets spayed or neutered not only helps control the pet population, but it also helps protect the animals from serious medical problems.

Dr. Cory Langston, associate professor of veterinary medicine at Mississippi State University, said spaying females before their first heat cycle eliminates the threat of uterine and ovarian infection or cancer. These are common in unaltered females.

Risk of tumors in the mammary gland, the milk producing gland, also can be reduced tremendously by spaying.

April 20, 1998 - Filed Under: Equine
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Most horses no longer help plow fields or herd livestock, but they can still teach children, even urban dwellers, responsibility.

Horse ownership is no longer limited to people who live on farms. In fact, equine industry watchers are noting a trend toward owners boarding horses with other people.

April 20, 1998 - Filed Under: Pets

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Pets may require more attention during hot weather, but a little extra care reduces the risk to a pet's safety and well-being.

When temperatures rise and pet owners go out of town, everyday care for animals may not be enough. Heat stress can cause serious side effects and is one problem pet owners need to be aware of.

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