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News Filed Under Landscape Architecture

September 8, 2011 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University’s 56th annual Edward C. Martin Design Symposium on Oct. 19 will focus on how landscapes can best fit their environment.

Michael Carlew (right), a senior studying landscape architecture and landscape contracting and management at Mississippi State University, talks to two other MSU students about the role landscape architects play in the environment. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
August 22, 2011 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A group of Mississippi State University students recently participated in a nationwide event to help educate others about the discipline and program they love.

Living screens can block out unpleasant views in landscapes in ways not possible with fences or walls. This row of pampas grass is green and full, even in the winter. (Photo by Gary Bachman)
January 6, 2011 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

January is a good time to take a look at your landscape because views are not obstructed by much foliage. When we can get a really clear view of what lies beyond our own yards, we sometimes don’t like what we see.

Many times we see the neighbor’s house or some view we’re not interested in. These views are hidden in the summer but seem to stare back in the winter. You may notice some traffic noise that gets blocked out by summer foliage.

You could build a privacy fence or wall, but these can seem a little cold and stark. It may be time to plant a living screen.

September 9, 2010 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Anyone who wants to learn about historic gardens of the South should plan to attend Mississippi State University’s 55th annual Edward C. Martin Jr. Landscape Design Symposium on Oct. 20.

The MSU Department of Landscape Architecture and the Garden Clubs of Mississippi, Inc., sponsor the event each fall to teach participants about landscape architecture and gardening. This year’s theme is the gardens and historic plants of the Antebellum South.

The showy, pink to pale violet, trumpet-shaped flowers of the desert willow bloom for weeks in the summer. This small tree is native to the Southwest but could be grown in Mississippi if it is not overwatered.
August 12, 2010 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

I spent last week in Palm Desert, Calif., where the daily temperatures were 110 degrees or more and the humidity was less than 20 percent.

The landscapes I saw there are completely foreign to our lush, green gardens. Yet the landscape was quite beautiful, not bleak as I had imagined. There were lots of flowering desert plants, and I quickly realized that one of the first things I needed to get was a desert plant guide.

Rain barrels collect water for homeowners to use in their landscapes. The collected water is free and does not have any of the residual chemicals found in tap water. (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
July 15, 2010 - Filed Under: Agricultural Engineering, Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Rain barrels are gaining popularity, as they can save both pocket change and the environment.

“There are a lot of good reasons to use rain barrels,” said Tom Cathcart, professor of environmental engineering in Mississippi State University’s Department of Agriculture and Biological Engineering. “Generally, for a residential property, it is the house that creates the large majority of displaced stormwater during a rain event. Managing this displaced water at the source is the best management practice we have.”

Mississippi State University's Landscape Architecture Delegates volunteered to help the family of a young girl with a serious nerve disorder. David Russell, Dustin Randall and Dale Brasher place plants around the family's pool to keep the soil intact. With the erosion problem solved, the girl can continue her regular pool therapy to ease her chronic pain.
April 29, 2010 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE — A group of Mississippi State University landscape architecture and contracting students stays busy outside the design studio by recruiting other students to join the program.

One of several tornadoes that ravaged Mississippi on April 24 knocked down trees along state Highway 389 in Oktibbeha County. Horticulturists with the Mississippi State University Extension Service advise people to use caution in removing trees and debris. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 26, 2010 - Filed Under: Farm Safety, Disaster Response, Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- On April 24, a series of tornadoes ripped through central Mississippi leaving 15 counties with substantial damage from wind, hail and water. As Mississippians begin the long process of rebuilding and cleaning up their tornado-ravaged landscapes, there are ways to make the process safer and easier.

Safety is the first consideration when removing damaged trees or large limbs that have fallen on electric power lines or pose other hazards to homes or people. Hire a professional to do this when the job is not safe.

January 25, 2010 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Those with a desire to learn the latest in a variety of landscape maintenance topics will have a chance to do so in a two-day short course offered through  Mississippi State University and the University of Arkansas.

The 2010 Landscape Short Course will be held Feb. 18-19 at the Desoto County Board of Education Building in Hernando. It is jointly sponsored by the MSU Extension Service and the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture.

A Nellie R. Stevens holly provides pleasing winter color to this home landscape, holding its abundant fruit through the dreary winter months. (Photo by Jeff Wilson)
January 14, 2010 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture

Numerous landscape plants have attractive foliage mixed with colorful berries, but few can match the brilliant luster of a holly.

The striking, dark green leaves of hollies provide a beautiful backdrop for their deep red and orange berries. Another reason these plants are so popular in the landscape is their ability to adapt to environmental conditions.

The wax myrtle produces thousands of small, waxy, blue berries that feed around 40 species of birds.
October 22, 2009 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture, Trees

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

In my region, the southern wax myrtle reigns supreme. When I say “my region,” you might think I mean the Deep South, but actually it stretches from Texas to the East Coast and as far north as New Jersey. You could not ask for a better small tree to act as a privacy screen around a porch, patio, deck, or garden bath or to soften harsh walls. Coastal residents are always looking for plants tolerant of salt spray, and wax myrtles are among the best.

In some areas, dogwoods are as exquisite as hollies with bright red, oval-shaped fruits, or drupes. (Photo by Norman Winter)
October 15, 2009 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

As I was touring the landscape of an Southeastern college, I noticed that everywhere I looked was a native dogwood. I couldn’t help but think to myself, “This dogwood is for the birds.”

My thought was not too far off because this small tree feeds 28 species of birds, including quails and turkeys. Deer and squirrels also love the fruit, making this tree an all-star for those wanting a backyard wildlife habitat.

September 17, 2009 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- People who want to learn more about unifying design concepts of homes and gardens should attend Mississippi State University’s 54th annual Edward C. Martin Jr. Landscape Design Symposium on Oct. 21.

The MSU Department of Landscape Architecture and the Garden Clubs of Mississippi Inc. sponsor the event each fall to introduce the public to new concepts in green design and the influence they have on daily life. This year’s theme is “Inside/Out,” which highlights how inside and outside environments can work together.

Red can be a difficult color to use in gardens, and the secret to its success sometimes lies in using it as an accent. The first thing that catches the eye in this outdoor room is the bright red Adirondack chairs. A short walk away is an idyllic children's play house of the same color. (Photo by Norman Winter)
August 27, 2009 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Red is a color that many gardeners want in the landscape but find very difficult to use successfully. The secret, however, may lie in your accent features.

It seems strange to think that red may be hard to use. There are red roses, red zinnias, red petunias and scores of other red flowers, but if you place them near each other, a wave of nausea may sweep over you.

November 6, 2008 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A landscape short course Dec. 10-12 at Mississippi State University will give professionals and enthusiasts a chance to learn more about plants and their maintenance.

Sponsored by the MSU Extension Service, the event will be in Dorman Hall. Early registration is $160 per person if paid by Dec. 1. Onsite registration is $200. The fee covers the cost of educational materials, supplies and some meals.

The short course will cover basic principles of landscape establishment and management.

Starkville garden club enthusiast Jane Loveless makes a point about plants with former landscape architecture professor Ed Martin, left, and department colleague Robert Brzuszek during a design symposium held annually at Mississippi State University. (Photo by Marco Nicovich)
October 16, 2008 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University professor Ed Martin spent nearly 40 years teaching landscape architecture students to use plants to create great outdoor spaces, and he felt others should understand this principle, too.

Soon after arriving at MSU in 1956, Martin began a partnership with the Garden Clubs of Mississippi to educate people about the function of the landscape. He started a design seminar open to the public.

September 25, 2008 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A former landscape architecture professor at Mississippi State University who influenced many professionals in the business today is coming back to campus to participate in a program he began in 1955.

January 24, 2008 - Filed Under: Family, Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Few events are more beautiful or memorable than an outdoor wedding in an idyllic setting, but actually making one happen takes a lot of planning and some fortunate timing.

Bob Brzuszek, an assistant professor of landscape architecture with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, suggested those hosting an outdoor wedding or reception start planning a year in advance.

September 28, 2006 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- An upcoming workshop will help people address many of the issues related to landscape design.

The 51st Mississippi Landscape Symposium is the longest running workshop of its kind in the country. The symposium will take place from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Oct. 18 in the Bost Auditorium at Mississippi State University.

May 4, 2006 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Commercial plant growers, retail garden centers, landscapers and people planning to enter one of those professions can preview the plants of tomorrow during an upcoming conference in Raymond.

The Mid-South Greenhouse Growers, Retail Garden Center/Landscape Conference will be held June 5-7 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center in Raymond, just south of Jackson on Highway 18.

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