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News Filed Under Forestry

October 14, 2002 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

PASCAGOULA -- Professional loggers and anyone interested in logging have an opportunity to learn more about the industry through a Nov. 20 and 21 logger education program developed by Mississippi State University's Extension Service.

The two-day program consists of three classes. An introduction to sustainable forestry will begin at 8 a.m. on the first day, followed by a logger safety class at 2 p.m. A class on best management practices will begin at 8 a.m. on the second day. Classes will take place at the La Font Inn at 2703 Denny Ave. in Pascagoula.

September 27, 2002 - Filed Under: Forest Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi and her sister southern states should continue to be the world's wood basket for decades to come, according to industry watchers and forestry specialists.

Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said the prominent opinion is that as populations and urban areas continue to grow in the southeastern United States, Mississippi will be situated ideally for supplying wood products.

July 29, 2002 - Filed Under: Forest Ecology, Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi avoided an epidemic of southern pine beetles last year, but a recent survey found epidemic numbers of the beetles in national forests in south Mississippi.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Forestry easily maintained its hold as Mississippi's second largest agricultural commodity, despite a 10-percent decline in value.

The 2001 farm value of forestry is estimated at $1.1 billion -- second to poultry's $1.5 billion level. Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said 2001 was harder on the forest industry than it was on landowners.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Give Christmas trees a second chance to be useful after the lights and tinsel are gone.

Finding uses for discarded Christmas trees is a tradition with its roots in 16th century Europe, said Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service.

October 19, 2001 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Most of Mississippi's Christmas trees made up this year for lost growth over the last couple of dry years, but the summer rains also increased the challenges from diseases.

Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said 2001 was a much better year for growth, but growers had to control twig and shoot blight with fungicides, especially on Leyland cypress. In recent years, Leyland cypress trees were especially susceptible to Cercospora, which is associated with drought stress.

August 31, 2001 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Recent rulings on Canadian lumber trade could have far reaching effects on Mississippi landowners considering the timber market this fall.

Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said the bottom of the pine sawtimber stumpage market is probably behind, thanks in part to the recent tariff imposed on Canadian softwood lumber imports.

August 13, 2001 - Filed Under: Forest Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- People spend a lot of time and money trying to keep their tax burden as low as possible, but when it comes to timber sales, many Mississippians pay too much in taxes.

Debbie Gaddis, assistant Extension professor of forestry at Mississippi State University, said proper record keeping and management can lower tax bills by allowing timber owners to take advantage of special tax programs available to them.

June 18, 2001 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The efficiency and sustainability of Mississippi's timber industry has helped grow it to the $1.2 billion value it has today.

The state has about 18.5 million acres of timberland. Of these, 70 percent are held by private, non-industrial owners. Mississippi's forest types are about 30 percent pine, 25 percent oak/pine mix and 45 percent hardwood.

Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said forests are quite resilient and the state is using more of its pine than its hardwoods.

December 18, 2000 - Filed Under: Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's timber industry took another hit in 2000 as prices and harvests continued to decline, giving the industry a lower value than last year.

Mississippi's timber harvest is estimated at $1.26 billion, a 1.3 percent decline from 1999. This value makes forestry the state's No. 2 crop in market value, behind poultry.

"This is the second small decline in timber harvest value since we set an all-time record high in 1998 of $1.36 billion," said Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service.

November 3, 2000 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Homeowners are cautioned every year to keep their Christmas trees watered, but growers are the one's needing that advice this year.

Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said this year's drought also could reduce the longevity of Christmas trees after harvesting.

"Trees won't be as healthy as normal, so they may dry out faster after harvest making water in the tree stand even more important this year," Dicke said. "On the other hand, it will be more water than they've seen in awhile."

August 28, 2000 - Filed Under: Forest Ecology, Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- It will create a high water bill this summer, but watering the lawn weekly may be the only way to keep some landscape trees alive through Mississippi's drought.

Glenn Hughes, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service in Hattiesburg, said pine trees in South Mississippi are probably faring the worst this year. Drought damage, however, is statewide.

August 28, 2000 - Filed Under: Forest Ecology, Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Forest fires raging out of control in the West give fire a bad name, but in non-drought times, Mississippi foresters use planned fires as management tools.

Glenn Hughes, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service in Hattiesburg, said fire historically has been a natural part of Southern pine forests.

July 21, 2000 - Filed Under: Forest Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Two relatively dry years are enabling loggers to reach less accessible trees, creating an oversupply of timber during a season that traditionally has sluggish markets.

"The extended dry weather is compounding the problem with prices, especially pulpwood," said Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service. "Pulp mills are only buying the wood needed immediately, so inventories back up in the woods."

June 19, 2000 - Filed Under: Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Good management and planning during the last century is paying off in the abundance and health of U.S. forests.

Marking the centennial anniversary of its founding, the Society of American Foresters recently compiled a list of forestry-related advances in the United States during the past 100 years. With about 700 professional members in Mississippi, the state organization works with the national group to make advancements in forestry.

March 20, 2000 - Filed Under: Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi hardwoods are a valuable commodity from the seedling stage through harvest, so efforts to improve survival rates for this challenging crop are paramount for timber landowners.

Mississippi State University forestry researchers are working to protect landowners' investments by finding solutions to several aspects of hardwood regeneration.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's forest industry dipped in 1999 after riding a wave of record highs in 11 of the last 12 years, but maintained its seventh year with a value in excess of a billion dollars.

Mississippi timber production has a 1999 estimated value of $1.33 billion, down almost 3 percent from 1998's all-time high of $1.36 billion. Despite the downturn, its value remains above 1997 levels. Forestry continues to hold the state's No. 2 spot in value, just behind poultry.

December 13, 1999 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Christmas is a special time for making memories. Not all the memories come from gifts, although the slippers that look like stuffed hens from the farm certainly make a lasting impression.

Christmas trees have a way of making a lasting memory just like the special ornaments that adorn them. Other than using a camera, one way to capture and make that Christmas memory last is with a living Christmas tree.

November 1, 1999 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Laura Martin

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- When the holiday scents of cinnamon, peppermint and fresh cookies fill the home, friends and families gather around the Christmas tree as one of the seasonal traditions.

Displaying a real Christmas tree is a traditional holiday practice in many homes.

Dr. Steve Dicke, a forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said the enjoyment of the family cutting a tree and decorating it at home every year is part of a great Christmas tradition.

October 22, 1999 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi landowners have continued to harvest trees while some segments of the timber market lag behind others.

Dr. Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said timber markets through the summer of 1999 indicate that timber is being harvested at about the same levels as last year, but prices have been generally lower. Pine sawtimber prices have been the bright spot this year. Those prices have held even with 1998's average, but other prices have dropped.

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