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News Filed Under Forages

March 12, 2014 - Filed Under: Forages, Livestock, Beef

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cattle producers can learn ways to improve their pastures at upcoming events taking place around the state this spring.

On April 10 in Starkville, the Oktibbeha County Extension office is hosting a cool-season forage tour at the Henry H. Leveck Research Farm on the south side of the Mississippi State University campus. The evening tour will be from 5 to 7 p.m.

Topics will include alfalfa, clovers, tall fescue, oats and ryegrass.

Dr. Dan Reynolds
February 5, 2014 - Filed Under: Weed Control for Crops, Weed Control for Forages, Weed Control for Lawn and Garden

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The Southern Weed Science Society recently honored several Mississippi State University students and faculty members for their outstanding contributions.

Alana Blaine of Starkville won first place in the Master of Science paper competition for her paper, titled “The Effect of Dicamba Concentration and Application Timing on Soybean Growth and Yield.” Blaine is an MSU graduate student studying weed science.

Rocky Lemus receives a merit award from Yoana Newman, a member of the American Forage and Grassland Council Board and Foundation Board, during the recent annual conference in Memphis on Jan. 14, 2014. (Photo by Virginia Tech/Chris Teutsch)
January 21, 2014 - Filed Under: Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A Mississippi State University forage expert received an award for outstanding contributions to the field from the American Forage and Grassland Council during its recent national meeting.

Rocky Lemus was recognized with the merit award for superior contributions to forage and grassland agriculture at the 2014 annual conference Jan. 14 in Memphis. He has a joint appointment with the MSU Extension Service and the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station.

Mississippi 2013 Estimated Value of Ag Production
December 19, 2013 - Filed Under: Catfish, Crops, Agricultural Economics, Forages, Livestock, Poultry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi’s top two agricultural commodities -- poultry and forestry -- maintained their strength in 2013, but most agronomic crop values took a hit from significantly lower prices than those earned in 2012.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said agronomic crop prices were a major drag in the state’s total agricultural commodity value despite good-to-great production levels.

November 15, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A special Nov. 19 seminar at a Mississippi State University greenhouse classroom will train participants in pasture and forage management for dual cattle systems.

The MSU Extension Service is hosting the free seminar to teach innovative concepts in this field. Guest speakers will be Rein van der Hoek and Martin Mena Urbina from the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Nicaragua.

October 18, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages, Livestock

IMISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University has planned three upcoming events to supply forage producers with the latest and best information possible to help them with production.

Rocky Lemus, forage specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, examines stem maggot damage on the tips of bermudagrass growing in research plots in the forage unit at the Henry H. Leveck Animal Research Farm in Starkville on Aug. 7, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 9, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages, Insects-Forage Pests

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Forage producers and their livestock are not the only ones admiring the plentiful bermudagrass fields and pastures across the state this year.

Another invasive insect has arrived in Mississippi, this time to take a bite out of potentially strong hay yields. Stem maggots are joining the list of invasive species in the state that includes fire ants, fall armyworms, kudzu bugs, and once upon a time, boll weevils.

June 19, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages, Livestock

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Forage and livestock producers across the state are invited to learn the latest research-based forage management recommendations at a warm-season grass tour at Mississippi State University.

More than 85 percent of Mississippi's hay and forage growers are livestock producers trying to supply their herds' needs. Persistent rains are delaying the cool-season forage harvest and reducing yields. (Photo courtesy of Rocky Lemus)
May 3, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- As pastures transition from cool-season to warm-season grasses, the state’s hay and forage producers hope for sunny days that are better suited to growing and harvesting quality crops.

April 23, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages, Weed Control for Forages, Beef

TYLERTOWN -- Cattle producers in Mississippi and Louisiana can learn about cattle health issues and forage weed control measures during a May 18 event in south Mississippi.

The Mississippi/Louisiana Beef and Forage Field Day will begin with registration at 8:45 a.m. at the Livestock Producers Sale Barn on Highway 98 East in Tylertown, Miss.

Featured speakers are Dr. Jaques Fuselier, of Louisiana State University’s School of Veterinary Medicine and Brandi Karisch, Rhonda Vann and John Byrd, all with Mississippi State University’s Extension Service.

April 4, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Cool-season forages will get special attention at an April 30 tour at Mississippi State University’s forage unit.

The Cool-Season Forage Tour begins with registration at 5 p.m. and runs from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Henry H. Leveck Animal Research Farm, commonly called South Farm, in Starkville.

Topics and demonstrations included on the tour are small grains evaluation, annual and perennial clovers, alfalfa variety testing and management systems, tall fescue varieties and nutrient management.

Dickcissels, such as this one, are sparrow-sized birds that prefer native grasslands for foraging and nesting and rely on insects for the bulk of their diet. Mississippi State University scientists are studying the use of native grasses as livestock forages. (Photo courtesy of Adrian Monroe)
March 25, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages

By Meg Henderson
Forest and Wildlife Research Center

STARKVILLE -- Studies at Mississippi State University are finding that when it comes to providing forage for livestock, native grasses may be best.

Sam Riffell, an associate professor of wildlife ecology and management in the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture, is examining the benefits of replacing exotic grasses, commonly used in Mississippi grazing pastures, with native, warm-season grasses.

January 15, 2013 - Filed Under: Insects-Crop Pests, Insects-Forage Pests, Nuisance Wildlife and Damage Management, Insects, Insects-Pests

RAYMOND – Producers and consultants can register now to hear agricultural specialists address the management of a wide variety of pests during a daylong workshop on Feb. 12.

The annual pest management workshop will take place at Mississippi State University’s Central Mississippi Research and Extension Center auditorium in Raymond. Registration is $10 and begins at 8:30 a.m. The program begins at 9 a.m., and sessions will conclude by 4:30 p.m.

Mississippi 2012 Estimated Value of Ag Production
December 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Corn, Cotton, Grains, Rice, Sweet Potatoes, Soybeans, Agricultural Economics, Forages, Livestock, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Forestry, Catfish

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Significant production levels and high market prices combined to give Mississippi’s agricultural commodities over $7 billion in total value.

Mississippi State University agricultural economists gathered preliminary data from crop production reports, world agricultural supply and demand estimates, industry resources and U.S. Department of Agriculture outlook reports. They predict a $7.3 billion annual value of the state’s top crops, excluding government payments. Final figures will be available in the spring of 2013.

Populations of glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass, such as this weed photographed in Washington County in 2010, have been found in 31 Mississippi counties. (Photo by MAFES/Tom Eubank)
November 29, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Weed Control for Crops, Weed Control for Forages, Invasive Plants

STONEVILLE – Research is backing producers’ intense efforts this fall to attack glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass using a variety of methods in attempts to limit the damage this troublesome weed can cause.

In 2005, Italian ryegrass resistant to the commonly used herbicide glyphosate was first identified in the state. Since then, it has been found in 31 Mississippi counties and is widespread throughout the Delta. This glyphosate-resistant weed emerges in the fall and grows throughout winter and early spring.

A grower in Oktibbeha County, Miss., has hay bales in the field and fall grasses already coming up on Oct. 26, 2012. This year's hay crop has the potential to be the fourth most valuable crop in the state, behind soybeans, corn and cotton. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Tim McAlavy)
October 26, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi’s hay producers increased acreage and yields this season in spite of variable rainfall across the state.

“Hay production systems in the central part of the state had a really good season,” said Rocky Lemus, Mississippi State University Extension Service forage specialist. “We’ve been blessed with quite a bit of rain in central Mississippi, and the hay crop has been better than average.

October 24, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forages

RAYMOND -- Forage experts from seven states will present current research and best management practices during a combined field day and conference Nov. 29 and 30.

The event will kick off at 1 p.m. Nov. 29 with the Brown Loam Field Day at the Brown Loam Branch Experiment Station in Raymond. The field day will dismiss at 4 p.m.

The 2012 Mississippi Forage and Grassland Conference will begin at 7:30 a.m. on Nov. 30 at the McKenzie Arena in the T.H. Kendal Agriculture Complex in Raymond. The conference will dismiss at 3 p.m.

October 18, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forages, Beef

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Nov. 9 is back-to-school time for cattle and hay producers when Mississippi State University hosts a daylong event in Meadville on topics related to cattle grazing and hay production.

The 2012 Southwest Mississippi Grazing School will be held at Sage Farms from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The school is limited to 80 participants on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration is free but must be completed by Nov. 2.

Common vetches and clovers, such as crimson clover, can be used as cover crops to prevent soil erosion, add organic matter, suppress weeds and retain soil moisture. (Photo courtesy of USDA-ARS/Bob Bjork)
September 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Long before scientists created commercial fertilizers, farmers used cover crops to increase soil health and productivity and many of today’s producers are returning to those roots.

Mississippi State University professor Jac Varco, a researcher with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, said a cover crop is one planted during the off-season to benefit the soil. Common cover crops include clover and vetch.

Mississippi State University Extension Service forage specialist Rocky Lemus examines a bermudagrass analysis from a portable forage tester on May 21, 2012, at the Henry H. Leveck Animal Research Farm, the forage unit at MSU's South Farm in Starkville. Forage and cattle producers can use test results to make harvest and feed supplement decisions. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
June 1, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Forages, Technology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University has the South’s first portable forage tester that can give hay and cattle producers immediate decision-making information and enable them to improve their profit margins.

Rocky Lemus, assistant Extension and research professor in MSU’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, said the small machine has big potential.

“We can use this year-round, testing grass in pastures and hay in fields during the growing season or testing hay in the barn during winter,” Lemus said.

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