You are here

Feature Story from 2011

Hay production is a key component of a successful livestock producer's management plan. Forage management practices, including weed control and fertilizer use, will be part of the spring grazing school offered by MSU Extension Service. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forages

Editors Note: The class scheduled for June 2 at the Prairie Research Unit was canceled on May 24 and will not be rescheduled.

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi State University Extension Service will offer its annual spring grazing school to help livestock producers with their forage management practices.

The 4-H Learning Center and Pete Frierson Museum is located at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum on Lakeland Drive in Jackson.  (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: 4-H, Family

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A museum showcasing the contributions of Mississippians who have participated in America’s largest youth organization is getting a high-tech renovation.

The Mississippi 4-H Learning Center and Pete Frierson Museum is undergoing a transformation of its exhibits, funded by a $120,000 grant from the Mississippi Land, Water and Timber Resources Board. As part of the larger Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum, the 4-H learning center focuses on the connection between youth and agriculture.

Several tornadoes that ravaged the region on April 26 and April 27 knocked down trees in affected areas. Horticulturists with the Mississippi State University Extension Service advise people to use caution in removing trees and debris. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Lelia Scott Kelly
Consumer Horticulture Specialist, North Mississippi Research & Extension Center

MISSISSIPPI STATE – As Mississippians begin the process of rebuilding and cleaning up their tornado-ravaged landscapes, they should consider ways to make the process safer and easier.    

Safety is the first consideration, so removing of any damaged trees or large limbs that pose a hazard to homes or people should come first.  Hire a professional to do this if you cannot safely do the job. 

April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Soils, Water, Water Quality

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The cumulative effect of many individual bad choices can be as harmful to the water quality in an area as if a major disaster occurred.

Amy Schmidt, water quality specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said overfertilizing lawns and pouring chemicals into storm drains harm water quality. But dumping unneeded medicines and personal care products into the sewer system can be just as bad.

The emerald ash borer is metallic green in color and about 1/2 inch long. The beetle's larva tunnels under the bark and disrupts the ash tree's absorption of food and water, eventually starving and killing it. (Photo by USDA ARS/Stephen Ausmus)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Environment, Insects, Insects-Pests

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Federal and state government experts have teamed up with Mississippi State University to search for a small beetle that could mean big trouble for Mississippi.

Ongoing rains are flooding fields, delaying planting and postponing needed management such as weed control. This south Monroe County corn field was flooded by late April storms. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 29, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton, Grains

MISSISSIPPI STATE – April’s heavy rains have been devastating Mississippi’s agriculture, as they delay planting, postpone management and flood fields.

Heavy rains that accompanied the late-April storms added to already soggy soils and are pushing some planting dates dangerously late.

April 29, 2011 - Filed Under: Community, Economic Development

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi State University Extension Service recently formalized a partnership with the Mississippi State University Small Business Development Center to enhance economic development opportunities for entrepreneurs across the state.

May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Community, Disaster Response

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Long before and long after tornadoes are on the ground, Mississippi State University Extension Service personnel are in position to lend a helping hand in every community impacted by a disaster.

Chickasaw County Extension director Scott Cagle is helping communities cope in the aftermath of two tornadoes: one that passed through around 3 a.m. on April 27 and the second, stronger tornado that followed a different path about 12 hours later.

May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Disaster Response-Youth, Family, Children and Parenting

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi River is predicted to reach historic flood levels this spring, and families can help their children by planning together for potential evacuations.

Mississippi State University Extension Service experts advise parents to take steps to prepare their children physically and emotionally so they can better deal with the challenges of being displaced from home.

Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine student Kamalailia Neizmen (left) locates a patient's microchip with a sensor as veterinary technician Elliot Benford (right) assists and assistant clinical professor Dr. Jody Ray supervises. (Photo by MSU's College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Thompson)
May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Disaster Preparedness, Pets

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – As heavy rainfall causes more flooding along the Mississippi River, residents in flood-prone areas may have to consider evacuation, and those with pets should have a plan of departure that includes their furry and feathered family members.

Dr. Mark Woodrey and Dr. George Hopper
May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Three Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station faculty members were recently recognized for their significant contributions to their fields.

Peter Ryan, Mark Woodrey and Ramon Arancibia were honored at the MAFES and Mississippi State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences annual spring meeting.

The April 27 tornadoes caused extensive damage to forestland in several Mississippi counties, resulting in an estimated $8.4 million in timber losses (Photo by Scott Corey)
May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Forest Economics, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Tornadoes that swept through Mississippi and much of the southeast April 27 caused an estimated $8.4 million of timber losses.

The Mississippi Forestry Commission compiled the estimate April 30 based on aerial surveys conducted after the storms. Russell Bozeman, director of forest protection and forest information with the commission, said the total affected area was about 26,240 acres. Of this, 15,564 were forested acres.

May 12, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Soils, Disaster Preparedness, Forest Soils, Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Farmers in the path of the cresting Mississippi River floodwaters should take precautions to minimize effects of the flood, and high on that list is moving farm chemicals out of harm’s way.

The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality is urging farmers, homeowners and those whose businesses deal with chemicals to beware of environmental issues that can result if flooding reaches them. Among the farm chemicals that should be moved are herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, fuels and treated seeds.

http://www.oac.msstate.edu/
May 12, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Commercial Horticulture, Fruit

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The growing season is blooming early for William Tucker, a fruit and vegetable producer participating in a grant-funded research program studying high tunnel use.

High tunnels, also called “hoop houses,” are unheated greenhouses that allow producers to extend the growing season. These structures insulate plants from cooler spring and fall temperatures by trapping warmer air inside a frame structure covered in plastic sheeting.

May 12, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Beef, Disaster Preparedness

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – As the Mississippi River continues to rise, those who keep cattle in Delta floodplains need to prepare to move them to higher ground.

Before evacuating, owners need to ensure their cattle are uniquely and permanently identified. Proper identification will be needed to prove ownership and to reclaim cattle before returning home.

May 12, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Dairy

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University will host two dairy field days June 28 and 29 to meet the educational needs of dairy producers in the state.

The 2011 MSU North Mississippi Dairy Field Day will be held June 28 in Verona at the North Mississippi Research and Extension Center. The 2011 MSU South Mississippi Dairy Field Day will be held June 29 in Tylertown at the Southwest Events Center Indoor Conference Facility.

May 12, 2011 - Filed Under: Family, Children and Parenting

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Children displaced by natural disasters have unique needs, and the Mississippi State University Extension Service has trained key personnel to set up child-friendly spaces in evacuation shelters.

Melissa Tenhet, project director for the Mississippi Child Care Resource & Referral Network, said emergency responders will help affected communities provide safe, fun and educational activities at shelters. Her staff has been trained in the Child-Friendly Spaces Program and the Incident Management System.

May 12, 2011 - Filed Under: Insects-Human Pests, Insects, Insects-Pests

MISSISSIPPI STATE – When floodwaters recede, Mississippians in affected areas should take steps to reduce exposure to mosquitoes and the diseases they may carry.

Jerome Goddard, medical and veterinary entomologist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, advises a common-sense approach to mosquito population control and encourages people to protect themselves from mosquito bites.

Michael Newman
May 13, 2011 - Filed Under: About Extension

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A Mississippi State University professor with more than 20 years of experience is the new director of the school of human sciences.

Since 2004, Michael Newman has served as a professor in agricultural information science and education as well as a specialist for the MSU Extension Service.

Pages

Feature Story Archive