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News Filed Under Crops

May 3, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Wheat

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi wheat growers will be among an elite group of farmers who will be able to enjoy record high prices. While the yield prospects are dim for the nation's leading wheat producing states, Mississippi's crop looks promising.

Wheat futures have reached the historic $7 per bushel level -- more than 60 percent higher than year-ago prices. Stocks are among the lowest ever and demand continues to be strong.

April 26, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Soybeans

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Recent April showers may bring later May plantings for much of Mississippi's soybean crop. Heavy rains have muddied efforts to get the state's soybean crop in the ground, but sunny days are giving growers hope for a timely-planted crop.

Mississippi's soybean crop planting is about 15 percent complete.

In the southern and northern parts of the state, rainfall was not as widespread, but central Mississippi received heavy, flooding rains.

April 22, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Insects-Crop Pests

By Douglas Wilcox

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- State farmers are hopeful that last winter's freezing weather helped give crop insect pests the cold shoulder for the 1996 growing season.

Mississippi State University entomologists are expressing "cautious optimism" on whether the low temperatures and prolonged wet winter had any effect on the insects that damage Mississippi crops each year.

Dr. Blake Layton, cotton entomology specialist at MSU, said Mississippi farmers may be in for a pleasant surprise this growing season because of the dipping mercury.

April 4, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- This year's growing season is off to a slow start as many different obstacles have kept farmers out of their fields.

Cool, wet weather during March and into early April has muddied fields and kept soil temperatures low. Growers in counties across the state are watching the weather and waiting for fields to dry.

April 4, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Technology

By Douglas Wilcox

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi soybean and cotton farmers should find it easier to decide what seed variety to plant these days, not by trial and error, but by accessing the Internet through their home computers.

The Mississippi soybean variety trials, conducted by the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, yield information ranging from how to select a seed variety for your field to the actual planting procedures. Any farmer in the world with a computer and Internet access can download the information from the World Wide Web.

March 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Agricultural Economics

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- This year's planting intentions report yielded few surprises as producers based many acreage decisions on market prices.

Economists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced their 1996 crop predictions March 29. The biggest change for Mississippi is corn acreage, rising from 300,000 acres in '95 to 550,000 acres for 1996 -- an 83 percent increase.

March 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops
UNITED STATES
EXPECTED ACREAGE IN MILLIONS
  1996 1995 CHANGE
CORN 79.92 71.24 +12%
COTTON 15.24 16.93 -10%
GRAIN
SORGHUM
10.62 9.45
January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton, Insects-Crop Pests

JACKSON -- Cotton growers opposed to the boll weevil eradication program believe a ruling by the Mississippi Attorney General's Office is good news, but supporters of the program believe it is good news for the boll weevils.

In a ruling released Jan. 25, prior to a joint meeting of the House and Senate Agriculture Committees, the attorney general's opinion was that growers could keep the program with a two-thirds majority voting in favor of continuing the program.

January 29, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton

GRENADA -- Cotton growers from Mississippi's eastern counties recently aired complaints against 1995's boll weevil eradication efforts and received information on improvements planned for 1996.

Growers from Region IV's 29 counties down the eastern side of the state joined growers from across Mississippi at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Boll Weevil Management Corp. in Grenada.

A devastating insect year resulted in growers from several counties accusing eradication efforts for low yields and crop failures.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- 1995 has proved to be a year of highs and lows for Mississippi agriculture as some crops reached record values while others experienced disastrous yields.

Forestry, poultry/eggs, catfish and horticulture crops saw increases in value, but the state's overall estimated value of farm production dropped $56 million this year. Agricultural economists at Mississippi State University predict the state's estimated value of farm production will reach $4.37 billion for 1995.

December 11, 1995 - Filed Under: Cotton

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Tobacco budworms didn't just take a bite out of cotton bolls, they joined the drought-like conditions to take a bite out of cotton growers' bank accounts.

"Growers not only harvested less cotton in 1995, but it was also one of the state's most expensive cotton crops ever," said Dr. Will McCarty, extension cotton specialist at Mississippi State University. "These two factors -- a smaller crop and higher costs -- are pushing a significant number of growers to the brink of financial disaster."

November 3, 1995 - Filed Under: Nuts

STARKVILLE -- Still reeling from the February 1994 ice storm, Mississippi's pecans struggled through drought conditions this summer and may end up yielding only about 40 percent of the state's crop potential.

Dr. Freddie Rasberry, extension horticulture specialist at Mississippi State University, said alternate bearing years are common in pecan production. Trees may yield 25 percent of their crop one year, 75 percent the next, then back down the next.

October 26, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Commercial Horticulture

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippians looking for state-grown pumpkins for Halloween jack o'lanterns or Thanksgiving pies will find shorter supplies and higher prices this year.

Consumers can expect pumpkins to wear a price tag ranging from 50 cents to $1 higher than last year. Due to short supplies of state-grown pumpkins, many of the pumpkins available locally have been shipped into Mississippi from southern Canada and the high plains of Texas.

October 20, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton, Rice, Soybeans, Agricultural Economics

STARKVILLE -- Cotton, rice and soybean growers have seen their August dreams turn into October nightmares as yield estimates have plunged in the wake of insects, heat and drought.

"In total economic impact, the state will not see about $900 million that cotton, rice and soybeans had the potential of making when the crops were evaluated in July," said DeWitt Caillavet, extension agricultural economist at Mississippi State University.

October 13, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton

STARKVILLE -- Late season cotton yield estimates have plummeted as drought and insect damage effects become apparent.

From the original yield estimate on Aug. 1 to the recently released Oct. 1 figures, Mississippi's harvest estimate has dropped 660,000 bales -- for a loss of hundreds of millions of dollars to the state's economy.

October 5, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton, Soybeans

STARKVILLE -- Hurricane Opal's unwelcome rains showed Mississippi's crops more mercy than Alabama's, but a delay in harvest is anything but good news for farmers struggling to put 1995 behind them.

The late-season hurricane dropped relatively small amounts of rain on the Mississippi Delta and from 2 to 3 inches on the eastern side of the state. Unfortunately, any rain at this point in the season provides only negative effects on the harvest-ready crops.

September 29, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Nuts

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

STARKVILLE -- With harvest in full swing, Mississippi's peanut crop is faring well despite this year's dry growing season. Although growers will not enjoy 1994's high peanut yields and quality, both disease and insect pressure have been light this year.

"This has been an off year for a lot of crops, but peanut yields are fairly good," said Dr. Alan Blaine, extension agronomist at Mississippi State University. "This is particularly true in the north Delta, considering how long it has been dry."

September 22, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Sweet Potatoes

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

STARKVILLE -- Growers are hoping for more rainfall to aid harvest of Mississippi's 6,000 acres of sweetpotatoes.

Acreage is up about 20 percent for 1995, due to good prices and expanding markets for Mississippi's sweetpotatoes.

"Our sweetpotatoes are high quality, and are competing well in the marketplace," said Benny Graves, plant pathologist with the Mississippi Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Plant Industry in Starkville.

September 15, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton

STARKVILLE -- Cotton yields will not be what many growers dreamed of when they increased Mississippi's crop by 100,000 acres to take advantage of stronger prices. Higher than normal insect pressure and excessive heat have taken their toll.

"Preliminary yields do not look good," said Dr. Will McCarty, extension cotton specialist at Mississippi State University.

The Sept. 1 crop report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture brought bleak news on the expectations for Mississippi's crop.

September 8, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Corn, Cotton, Soybeans

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Hot, dry conditions that have burned up yards and pastures cannot do much more damage to Mississippi's row crops. Any rains arriving at this point will have little impact on the crops' development and may hurt harvest quality.

Dr. Erick Larson, extension agronomist at Mississippi State University, said corn may be the one bright spot for this year's dim harvest outlook. Recent weather conditions have helped the corn dry appropriately for harvest.

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