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News Filed Under Christmas Trees

November 4, 2005 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's Christmas tree growers were having a great year, and then Hurricane Katrina hit.

Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said frequent summer rains had trees growing very well until Katrina's heavy rain and strong winds blew many over. The following drought prevented some growers from being able to right affected trees.

November 5, 2004 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Weather conditions made 2004 a challenging year for the state's Christmas tree growers, but Mississippians should have no problem finding top quality, affordable trees to decorate their homes this holiday season.

Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said choose-and-cut tree sales reached 100,000 last year in Mississippi. Similar sales are expected this year.

November 6, 2003 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Enjoy the fresh smell of a live Christmas tree longer by shopping at one of the state's remaining choose-and-cut farms.

Steve Dicke, Christmas tree specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said between 1985 and 1987, the state had about 450 choose-and-cut farms. The 100 remaining farms represent some of the best quality trees available this holiday season. Locally grown trees offer fresher products than consumers will find on most retail lots.

November 1, 2002 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- State Christmas tree growers had an excellent growing season this year and have high hopes for a happy holiday.

Steve Dicke, Christmas tree specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the trees were able to use nearly all the heavy rains that came throughout the year.

"We hope it dries out sometime so the customers can get out in the fields and cut their own trees, but until harvest, we're not really concerned about it," Dicke said.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Give Christmas trees a second chance to be useful after the lights and tinsel are gone.

Finding uses for discarded Christmas trees is a tradition with its roots in 16th century Europe, said Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service.

October 19, 2001 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Most of Mississippi's Christmas trees made up this year for lost growth over the last couple of dry years, but the summer rains also increased the challenges from diseases.

Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said 2001 was a much better year for growth, but growers had to control twig and shoot blight with fungicides, especially on Leyland cypress. In recent years, Leyland cypress trees were especially susceptible to Cercospora, which is associated with drought stress.

November 3, 2000 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Homeowners are cautioned every year to keep their Christmas trees watered, but growers are the one's needing that advice this year.

Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said this year's drought also could reduce the longevity of Christmas trees after harvesting.

"Trees won't be as healthy as normal, so they may dry out faster after harvest making water in the tree stand even more important this year," Dicke said. "On the other hand, it will be more water than they've seen in awhile."

December 13, 1999 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Christmas is a special time for making memories. Not all the memories come from gifts, although the slippers that look like stuffed hens from the farm certainly make a lasting impression.

Christmas trees have a way of making a lasting memory just like the special ornaments that adorn them. Other than using a camera, one way to capture and make that Christmas memory last is with a living Christmas tree.

November 1, 1999 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Laura Martin

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- When the holiday scents of cinnamon, peppermint and fresh cookies fill the home, friends and families gather around the Christmas tree as one of the seasonal traditions.

Displaying a real Christmas tree is a traditional holiday practice in many homes.

Dr. Steve Dicke, a forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said the enjoyment of the family cutting a tree and decorating it at home every year is part of a great Christmas tradition.

November 20, 1998 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Jamie Vickers

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A drought, hurricane and fewer growers will not prove to be a problem for Mississippians who appreciate homegrown Christmas trees this holiday season.

"The 1997 production figures were up 6.5 percent from the previous year, and the sales from the choose-and-cut market were up 10 percent," said Dr. Bob Daniels, Extension forestry specialist at Mississippi State University. "This is our third straight year of increases."

Last year 245,000 Christmas trees were sold in Mississippi at a value of $7.6 million.

December 18, 1997 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Christmas Trees, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Not only is it kind of depressing, it is also a chore to take down the Christmas tree. To make matters worse, the room then looks bare.

My favorite Mississippi restaurant fights this dilemma by leaving the Christmas tree up all year. In February, it is a Valentine tree, followed by an Easter egg tree and on through various celebrations. It is also obvious to you now, that it is an artificial tree.

December 4, 1997 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Dare to be different in your Christmas tree selection. Select a living Christmas tree that can be planted in your landscape when Christmas is over. This tree will serve as a special memory of holidays from years past.

November 24, 1997 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Christmas Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Years of hard work are about to pay off for Mississippi's 140 Christmas tree growers.

Unlike the state's annual crops, farmers have a long wait before reaping the harvest rewards. Six-foot trees take about four years to grow.

Dr. Steve Dicke, extension forestry specialist in Raymond, said the enormous effort involved in growing trees has reduced the number of Mississippi Christmas tree growers over the years. The state had 450 growers in 1985 when the industry was in its infancy.

November 8, 1996 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Christmas Trees

By Allison Powe

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi Christmas trees have thrived under unusually good growing conditions this year, and the trees are ready to be harvested by spirited holiday enthusiasts.

Dr. Stephen Dicke, extension forestry specialist in Raymond, said Mississippi's trees have weathered well this year and are looking good. Growers are facing only a few problems, such as needlecast, in some areas of the state.

Starkville grower Jeffrey Krans said needlecast is a disease that causes needles to fall out and affects tree density.

November 10, 1995 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Christmas Trees

By Dawn R. Hanna

STARKVILLE -- Mississippi Christmas tree growers welcome this year's crop with anticipation for a happy holiday season.

"Overall the crop looks great in spite of the drought," said Dr. Steve Dicke, extension forestry specialist in Raymond. "A few growers experienced some disease problems, but the outcome of the crop in general is outstanding."

Last year 220,000 Mississippi-grown trees were sold for about $5.2 million.

"Growers expect sales to be as good or better than last year," Dicke said.

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