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January 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Family
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- In reality, outdoor Mississippi weddings are often very different from the imagined clear skies with a cool breeze rustling through the flowers.

Mississippi has many beautiful outdoor wedding settings with fresh air and open spaces. But it is very hot in the summer with humidity, bugs and afternoon rains that must be planned for.

Ann Stevenson, area extension agent in the northwest district (Panola County), said outdoor wedding can be successful, but require more time and effort.

January 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Children and Parenting
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Couples are no longer the only ones adjusting to new marriages. Children from previous relationships often have the hardest time adapting to a new parent in the house.

Dr. Louise Davis, extension child and family development specialist at Mississippi State University, said effective communication early-on is the key to helping children accept step-parents.

January 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Food and Health
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Newlyweds can avoid the common problem of gaining weight by eating healthy and exercising as a team.

"Exercise is important for everyone's physical and emotional condition," said Linda Patterson, extension health specialist at Mississippi State University. "It's a great way to relieve stress and control weight."

Patterson said early in a marriage is a good time to develop a habit of regular exercise.

January 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Family Financial Management

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- One of the biggest and most immediate challenges facing newly-married couples is choosing and paying for their first home.

Couples have several housing options from which to choose. They may choose to rent an apartment or a house, or they can buy or build a house.

Dr. Frances Graham, extension housing specialist at Mississippi State University, said most young couples choose to rent at first. They need time to decide and agree on their preferences and tastes for a more permanent home.

January 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Family Financial Management

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- If the thought of an expensive wedding is discouraging, consider a variety of alternatives to keep costs down.

Dr. Beverly Howell, extension family economics and management specialist at Mississippi State University, said many young couples today choose to keep their wedding budget as low as possible in order to save money for other things.

"Many young couples are asking themselves if they want to put a lot of money into the wedding," Howell said.

January 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Community

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Even though preparing for a wedding is usually a stressful time for the bride and groom, stress does not have to take control. By staying organized and healthy a couple can overcome stress and have a joyful wedding.

Linda Patterson, extension health specialist at Mississippi State University, said stress is created by the mind and couples should watch their thoughts.

January 8, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Many new exciting plants are coming our way in 1998, but one new impatient really has growers chomping at the bit to start planting.

Victorian Rose isn't an antique or heirloom rose, but it is the new All-American winning impatient. Hopefully, we will find Victorian Rose is the best semi-double flowering impatient.

January 2, 1998 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Producers with insured crops in South Mississippi damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Georges can get relief for the loss by following the proper claims process.

Dr. John Robinson, ag economist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said Mississippi has about 60,000 acres of corn, cotton, soybeans and wheat in the 15 southeastern counties.

January 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Houseplants

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Growing flowers outdoors is a common practice most gardeners enjoy, but growing plants to bloom indoors is a pleasure many are reluctant to try except for African violets.

The pineapple, our symbol of hospitality in the South, comes from a plant group that we not only overlook but view with trepidation. This group is the bromeliads.

December 25, 1997 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Low light conditions make it hard to grow some plants indoors. A bright sunny day may register as much as 10,000 foot candles of light while indoors may be 500 or less.

When we want to have plants in those low light areas, it makes sense to select wisely. We can choose plants that will perform well under such conditions.

December 19, 1997 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton, Agricultural Economics
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- How can Mississippi cotton growers harvest a record 900 pound average and not be enthusiastic about the crop?

1997 was the first year since 1983 that Mississippi cotton growers planted less than 1 million acres, and only the third time since record keeping began in 1866. Growers had governmental incentive to reduce acres in 1983 due to abundant supplies. In 1997, the incentives not to plant cotton came from market prices.

December 19, 1997 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Forestry
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The forestry industry continued its record breaking pace in the state, setting its 10th record in 11 years with 1997's estimated value of $1.22 billion.

Dr. Bob Daniels, extension forestry specialist at Mississippi State University, projected a 3 percent increase over 1996's forestry value. Pine prices and production were up, while hardwood saw a slight price increase and harvest decrease.

December 19, 1997 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Poultry
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- State poultry producers saw record broiler and egg production with 1997 values up 6 percent to more than $1.43 billion.

Dr. Wallace Morgan, head of Mississippi State University's poultry department, said the state's poultry industry has grown steadily for the last 10 years. Mississippi now ranks No. 4 nationally in broiler production.

"Domestic consumption continues to increase, our exports have been growing very rapidly and Mississippi has been a favored state for growth," Morgan said.

December 19, 1997 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton, Soybeans, Agricultural Economics, Poultry, Forestry, Catfish
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's total value of production posted an new record of $4.9 billion, an increase of 3 percent from 1996. Casual observers might think a 3 percent change means little happened in Mississippi's 1997 farm economy.

"Several row crops had significant changes in their total value this year, but that was largely because of planted acreage changes," said Dr. John Robinson, extension agricultural economist at Mississippi State University.

December 18, 1997 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Christmas Trees, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Not only is it kind of depressing, it is also a chore to take down the Christmas tree. To make matters worse, the room then looks bare.

My favorite Mississippi restaurant fights this dilemma by leaving the Christmas tree up all year. In February, it is a Valentine tree, followed by an Easter egg tree and on through various celebrations. It is also obvious to you now, that it is an artificial tree.

December 11, 1997 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

There is a new pot in town. Chimenea, which is Spanish for fireplace or stove, have been for sale at nurseries and garden centers for more than a year and their popularity has risen dramatically.

For those of you who have wished for an outdoor fireplace to sit around with a cup of hot chocolate or coffee, then the chimenea may be just what you need. They are made out of clay and come in a wide range of sizes, colors and designs.

December 8, 1997 - Filed Under: Family, Food and Health, Nutrition

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippians will have many opportunities to celebrate during the holidays, but take extreme caution when alcohol is served.

Nutrition guidelines set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture do not recommend the consumption of alcohol. For those who intend to drink anyway, USDA recommends only moderate drinking.

Dr. Barbara McLaurin, extension human nutrition specialist at Mississippi State University, said USDA's definition of moderate drinking is different for men and women.

December 8, 1997 - Filed Under: Family
By Ms. Bonnie A. Coblentz
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Home and auto burglaries can happen any time of the year, but seem more frequent and worse at the holidays.

Many otherwise cautious people get careless with security in the mad shopping rush. And when opportunities present themselves, some people steal from houses filled with gifts under trees and cars displaying the day's purchases.

Dr. Frances Graham, extension housing specialist at Mississippi State University, said people should be more cautious around the holidays.

December 8, 1997 - Filed Under: Family, Food and Health

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cold winter weather may bring the need for extra layers of clothes, but it does not have to bring extra pounds.

The cooler temperatures and shorter days leave many people sitting inside, eating too much and exercising too little. People who allow the change of seasons to change their daily activities are at risk for gaining weight.

Linda Patterson, extension health and safety specialist at Mississippi State University, said winter weight gain can be a problem for people of all ages.

December 8, 1997 - Filed Under: Community, Technology, Family
By Ms. Linda M. Breazeale
MSU Extension Service

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Clothing designers and manufacturers can benefit from a Mississippi State University professor's efforts to improve computer software programs.

Dr. Phyllis Bell Miller, assistant professor of human sciences, pioneered the art of apparel design on personal computers in the 1980s. Today, she's on the brink of major advancements that will make the programs even more diverse.

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